Manchester Property Market Growth at 12 Year High

Manchester Property Market Growth at 12 Year High

Latest figures released by the Hometrack Index show Manchester property market growth to have hit a 12 year high in 2016. This gives the city the second highest rate of price growth in the UK, next to Bristol.

A rise of 8.9% year-on-year for Manchester was reported, with experts predicting that the city will overtake Bristol for pole position by the end of the first quarter of 2017. The figures for Manchester exceed the average year-on-year increase across the UK, which came in at 7.7%.

Strong market fundamentals, particularly a significant supply/demand imbalance in Manchester, keep pressure on prices high. Despite the same supply/demand imbalance in the capital however, London dropped to seventh place for price growth in 2016.

Strong Market Fundamentals Keep Manchester Property Market Growth Thriving

Manchester’s vibrant rental market is also thriving, with demand continuing to grow. This, of course, makes it a dream opportunity for buy-to-let investors. Indeed, the city was recently named the UK’s buy-to-let hotspot by HSBC. This is all despite the massive challenges faced by buy-to-let investors following the government’s attacks on landlords.

The growing popularity of property crowdfunding is helping prospective buy-to-let investors push back against these attacks, providing a welcome haven for those keen to benefit from a steady stream of secured rental income.

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Rental growth here is 13 times that of London, driven by the growing population of young renters, flocking to the city for studying and career opportunities. Manchester boasts 60% more 25-29 year olds than the UK average, placing it within the country’s fastest growing demand for short term lets.

Massive Investment In Manchester Fuelling Property Market Growth

Success is also compounded by the government’s whopping £7 billion investment in Manchester. Determination to develop a world-class infrastructure in the city will attract further billions of worldwide investment over the coming years, which is already evident as overseas investors hone in on the investment opportunities offered here.  

Over 100,000 students across Manchester’s four main higher education institutions give it the highest student population in Europe.

70,000 of these are not in student halls of residences, meaning they are renting privately within the city. This makes it prime territory for PBSA (Purpose Built Student Accommodation) investment.

Across the board, from the UK-leading purchase market, to the thriving private rental and student markets, right through to commercial investments, Manchester is winning. As growth in the city’s property market continues at an unprecedented pace, with huge investment fuelling projected growth for years to come, we remain confident in the continued promise that our city offers investors.

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Apache Capital Partners Fund 466 Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester

Apache Capital Partners Fund 466 Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester

Property investment management firm, Apache Capital Partners, has teamed with Moda Living to secure senior debt financing of £85m, secured on the Angel Gardens development in Manchester city centre. The development will create 466 private rental sector homes in Manchester.

Deutsche Pfandbriefbank has agreed to a four-year term funding contract for the construction period of the development, which will convert to an investment loan for the rest of the term. The development is set to cost a total of £153m. Completion of the project is set for 2020.

The premium private rental sector apartments will stand 34 storeys tall, making it one of the tallest residential towers built outside London since the 2008 crash. Covering 520,000 sq ft, the Angel Gardens development forms part of the NOMA redevelopment project, regenerating a 20-acre site opposite Manchester’s Victoria station.

Angel Gardens and Beyond…

Angel Gardens, however, is not the only private rental sector delivered by the joint venture between Apache and Moda Living. It will be the first of many private rental sector developments created by the venture. In the pipeline is a total of 5,000 new private rental sector homes across eight cities across the UK, including London and the south east.

Johnny Caddick, managing director at Moda Living, believes the project will “set new expectations for rental housing in Manchester and throughout the UK”.

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Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester: On Trend

Investing in property in Manchester is becoming a real trend for high profile investors. And the private rental sector is hot property, considering the vast increase in those seeking rental accommodation. It is mainly the young professionals, who are flocking to the city for its huge career opportunities, that make up the bulk of renters in the city. Angel Gardens will be ideally placed for the many employed in the NOMA area, as well as those commuting into Manchester Victoria.

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An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

Traditionally, only those with access to large amounts of capital have been able to invest in the lucrative world of property. Managing a portfolio is normally time-consuming, business, which becomes increasingly more burdensome as the investor’s portfolio becomes larger.

However, in the last few years, a new method of property investment has emerged which has effectively democratised the entire investment process, allowing more people than ever to benefit from the financial gains that property investment can offer.

Property crowdfunding started to take off in 2012, and is now worth billions of dollars a year worldwide. The value of the industry currently doubles every two months, and is set to be worth $250bn by 2020.

The growth of the property crowdfunding industry has been catalysed, in part, by the relaxation of regulations over the last few years. The Government has identified the industry as being hugely beneficial to the economy, and has also begun investing in crowdfunding itself. Institutional investment is also coming into play at an increasing rate, and high net worth investors, attracted by the simplicity of the process, and the returns available, are also investing through property crowdfunding.

But why is investing in property crowdfunding proving so popular?

Offering the chance to build a diverse portfolio without all the legwork involved in traditional property investment models, and with the opportunity for significant gains, it’s no surprise that investing in property crowdfunding has grown exponentially in the last few years.

What’s more, as interest rates on savings continue to crawl along the seabed, and returns from both rental and sales continue to rise, more and more people are waking up to crowdfunding as a simple way to grow their money.

How Does It Work?

Property crowdfunding encompasses both equity investments and debt based investment (also known as peer to peer secured lending).

The concept itself is relatively simple.

Equity investments involve a group of people pooling their cash to buy a property as shareholders through a ‘Special Purpose Vehicle’ (SPV). The SPV is a limited company, set up solely for the purchase of that property. The SPV handles all the work, fees and maintenance of the property, whilst the shareholders receive their proportion of the rental yields, and/or share of capital gains when the property is sold.

People can invest even very small sums in buying shares in the property. On some platforms, this is as low as £50, but the typical minimum is between £500 and £1000. One of the advantages of property crowdfunding is that you can spread your available capital over a number of different properties across the crowdfunding platform, to mitigate risk.

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Getting started is a very quick and easy process. You simply register on your chosen website – it is an FCA requirement that only registered and accredited investors may participate, and, once registered, you simply select the properties you wish to invest in.

Debt based investments again involve pooling resources, in this instance, to make micro loans through the platform to a third party borrower. The loan as a whole is secured against the borrower’s property and the platform appoints an agent to act on behalf of lenders and take any necessary enforcement action. These types of investment are usually short term (up to 12 months, and pay a fixed rate of interest with no capital growth).

Where Did It Start?

The House Crowd is the longest-established property crowdfunding platform. It began trading in 2012 and offers both debt and equity investments. Since then, other companies have followed in their footsteps, such as Property Moose in 2013, and Property Partner and Crowdlords in 2014. The industry continues to expand, with several new platforms emerging each year.

Is It Regulated?

Property crowdfunding firms are all regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which ensures that platforms are managed properly, and that risks are made completely clear to investors. As with any investment, there is risk to capital – but it’s worth comparing this risk against other investment classes, and seeing how property crowdfunding stacks up.

Before investing through property crowdfunding platforms, it is very important to do your research. Every regulated platform should have the FCA authorisation number clearly visible on their website. If you can’t find these details, you should steer clear as they are not operating legally.

Is It The Right Choice For Me?

As with any investment, you need to take into account your personal circumstances to establish whether it is the right one for you.

You can find out more about establishing whether property crowdfunding is the right investment for you here.

Ask yourself what you wish to achieve. Investors with a lot of professional experience and access to bank funding, may find the model less appealing than novices.

If, on the other hand, you don’t have a deposit available, or aren’t able to get a mortgage, then investing through property crowdfunding could be an ideal way for you to access this asset class. And, given the government’s recent attacks on landlords, which has severely undermined the profitability and viability of buy-to-let investing for individual investors, it may well be that crowdfunding remains the only sensible option available for most.

Risk

The same principles that apply to other forms of property investment also apply to crowdfunding. You should be aware that capital growth profits are speculative, and investing in properties that produce a healthy cash flow is the more sensible approach.

One of the major risks associated with cash flow positive properties is that of damage or non-payment of rent. As such, you should always factor this in as an eventuality that may affect your yields. As mentioned above, however, if you have a well-diversified portfolio, with your capital spread over several properties, any losses due to one bad tenant will be more bearable than if you had all your eggs in one basket.

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At the end of the day, it all comes down to your risk tolerance. You do lose a large amount of leverage by investing through property crowdfunding, and you will only benefit proportionately from the property’s capital growth but, at the same time, having no borrowing means significantly less risk as there are no mortgage payments and no danger of the property being repossessed (as shareholders own it outright).

If making crowdfunded debt-based investment, (aka peer to peer lending) you need to know what would happen if the borrower defaults and does not repay the loan. You should ask questions about how your investment would be protected, what happens in the event of a default – how easy is it to take control of the secured property? – and how much equity is available to enable you to recover your money should the worst happen. Unless there is sufficient equity in the property, you could risk losing some or all of your money.

If you opt for debt-based investments, your investment will be secured by a legal charge. A critical matter to consider is at what LTV the loan is made. If, for example, a loan is made at ‘75% LTV’, it means that you will be at risk of losing some of your capital if the borrower defaults, the property has to be seized, and is sold for less than 75% of its current valuation.

Debt investments are generally considered to be lower risk than equity investments, as lenders are always paid out before shareholders, however, you do not get the potential upside of capital growth.

What About If I Want Out of My Investment?

If you need a liquid asset, then property is not the best choice.

Investing through property crowdfunding facilitates liquidity to some degree as it may be easier to sell shares in a property than the whole property. However, there is never any guarantee that you will be able to find a buyer, and, if you cannot do so, you will have to wait until the property is sold.

Some platforms will help you to find a buyer after the expiry of a minimum term, but you should check the small print before you invest. If you’re looking for a short term investment, P2P secured lending may be the better option.

To Conclude

We hope that this has offered you some valuable insight into getting started investing through property crowdfunding. Of course, you should know everything about the ins and outs of any investment before you part with your money, and we are fully committed to helping you know all you need to.

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If you have any questions, you can always get in touch with us and we will be very happy to fill you in.

Traditional Property Investment versus Property Crowdfunding

Traditional Property Investment Versus Property Crowdfunding

Property crowdfunding and traditional property investment have some significant differences. The main difference is to be found in the nature of managing the investment.

Whilst those who favour traditional property investment value the sense of control associated with full ownership of a property, there are significant costs and time commitments involved in maintaining their investment, Property crowdfunding on the other hand is to a very large extent a passive investment with thord parties managing everything on your behalf. So if you do not have the time, nor the resources, to keep up with the demands of building a property portfolio it can be a very attractive option.

There are also additional financial implications to consider, and we will go into these in this article.

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Responsibility

Property crowdfunding eliminates many of the responsibilities involved with traditional property investment. An investor wishing to create a properly diversified portfolio of properties will invest large sums on a smaller range of properties, and will be responsible for everything from biological disruptions (by infestation of plant or animal life), to managing tenants and weathering void periods on a rental property. With a crowdfunded property investment, none of these aspects apply, as they are taken care of by a third party.

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Furthermore, the due diligence, prequalification and vetting of an investment property are all handled by the SPV (Special Purpose Vehicle), the company behind the purchased property.

If, on the other hand, you have the skills and experience necessary to avoid mistakes and handle the investment on your own, then traditional property investment will probably be a lucrative way to grow your money. That being said, you will need substantially more money in the first place in order to make your first investment purchase.

Fees and Costs

There’s also the matter of fees. A traditional property investor will have to contend with solicitors’ fees, mortgage broker fees, loan arrangement fees, and surveyor charges, for example. With property crowdfunding, these fees are included within the overall cost required to sell the property, as listed on the crowdfunding platform’s website.

It’s also worth learning from the mistakes many property investors made ahead of the 2008 property crash. Many found that their mortgage lenders had allowed them to leverage at a rate that exceeded their affordability. The banks then revalued people’s assets, leading to a swathe of repossessions, subsequent catastrophic loss, and bankruptcies.

Checking the small print and getting legal advice when investing with the traditional property investment model is wise. Then again, none of this applies to property crowdfunding.

This is, of course, a worst-case scenario for traditional property investors. It is, nonetheless, one that still bears some weight. If mortgage rates rise, those who have invested with a mortgage may find themselves out of pocket. Buy-to-let investors should take the obvious step of making sure that their monthly rental income covers, at the very least, their mortgage repayments by at least 130% and should factor in potential mortgage rate rises.

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Buy-to-let landlords have also been hit by changes in Government legislation that have removed the ability for these landlords to deduct interest from profits from their tax liability, which can prove a further obstacle to ensuring the profitability of their investment. Again, there are no such risks with property crowdfunding, which usually buys properties for cash with no or minimal borrowing.

Challenges and Rewards

Whilst there are challenges involved with investing in property in the traditional manner, there are also a great many rewards. First of all, rather than earning a percentage of returns based on your initial investment sum (as with crowdfunding), once all outgoings (such as loans and legal fees, for example) have been taken into account, an outright property investor could earn a potentially much higher return.

There is, however, a downside to this. Where a traditional investor leverages a lot of cash, the risks to the investment are increased dramatically. Should the investment value fall, they could stand to lose a very significant amount. Whilst risk is, of course, not negated with property crowdfunding, no mortgage is necessary.

Selling Your Investment

Another benefit of traditional property investment is the control over when to sell the investment. If you are able to sell at a profit, and as quickly as you require, then the power is in your hands. Property crowdfunding, on the other hand, usually requires a majority vote from all shareholders if you wish to sell before the end of the investment term.

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To Conclude

Property investment, whether traditional or crowdfunded, has long been a profitable investment choice. Whilst both forms of investment carry risk, there are significant pros and cons on both sides, which potential investors need to factor into their investment decision.

Weighing up which type of property investment is right for your particular needs is key to ensuring that you are confident in where to place your money. At the end of the day, however, whichever path to property investment you choose, there is potential for great returns.

Our August 2016 Statistics: P2P Secured Loans

Our August 2016 Statistics: P2P Secured Loans

In addition to our equity-based crowdfunding investments, did you know we also offer peer-to-peer secured loans for real estate? We’ve been offering these since 2015, with much success. See below details of our August 2016 statistics to find out how these performed last month.

What is secured peer to peer lending for real estate?

Peer to peer lending is a type of debt financing, allowing individuals to borrow money without backing or by using traditional financial institutions. By lending through P2P on real estate, there is the chance for higher return yields (though, of course, this comes with some risk to capital). You can find out more with our free Guide to Making Peer To Peer Secured Loans.

Check out how these performed in our August 2016 statistics…

Here’s the stats to show how these P2P secured loans are doing as of August 2016 (Gross):

  • Total Sum Loaned –£8,784,684
  • Total Returns Paid – £127,241
  • No of Loans – 22
  • No of Loans Repaid – 7
  • Average Loan Period – 10 months
  • Default Rate – 0%
  • Average Loan Size – £399,304
  • Average Loan to Value – 68%
  • Average Interest Rate Paid – 9.00%

You can learn more about our secured peer to peer loans by downloading our free guide here.

You can also read more about our new peer to peer loans, equity investments and property crowdfunding by simply registering on our website by hitting the purple button. Alternatively, have a browse through our current investment opportunities by clicking the blue button!

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If you have any questions about investing in peer to peer secured lending or property crowdfunding, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us. We’re always happy to offer advice and information on all aspects of property investment to help you choose the right investment method for you.

The Alternative Finance Marketplace: How is Real Estate Shaping Up?

We’ve been eagerly poring through NESTA’s 2015 UK Alternative Finance Industry Report, ‘Pushing Boundaries’, since it was published in February this year. The report offers a fascinating, in-depth look at all areas of the alternative finance industry, including – crucially – the Real Estate Alternative Finance (crowdfunding and Real Estate P2P lending) market.

If you like data, you’ll love it. But if you’d prefer something a bit more readable, you’ll be pleased to hear that we’ve put together our own guide to the state of the alternative finance industry, keeping the emphasis squarely on Real Estate Alternative Finance, of course.

Things have changed since NESTA published its report, ‘The Rise of Future Finance’ in 2013. At that time, the alternative finance industry was worth £939m.  In 2015, NESTA reported its value at £3.2bn. The market is on course to surpass the £5bn mark in 2016.

Real Estate Alternative Finance - QUOTE 1

It’s not just financially that the alternative finance sector has grown. It has evolved taxonomically, too.

In the 2013 report, NESTA identified a range of distinct funding models operating in the sector. Two years later, 28% of alternative finance platforms surveyed reported that they were operating a ‘mixed’ or ‘other’ business model, which does not fit into the existing taxonomy.

Real Estate Alternative Finance: Crowdfunding and P2P Lending Tops the Tables

The 2013 report has no mention whatsoever of the terms ‘real estate’ or ‘housing’. And yet, by 2015, NESTA’s report segments data on Real Estate Alternative Finance into its own category, such is the proportion of the industry it covers.

In 2015, Real Estate and Housing was the most popular sector for the alternative finance market.

  1. Real Estate and Housing
  2. Technology
  3. Manufacturing and Engineering
  4. Food and Drink
  5. Retail and Wholesale
  6. Leisure and Hospitality
  7. Community and Social Enterprise
  8. Finance
  9. Construction
  10. Education and Research

Combined debt and equity-based funding for Real Estate Alternative Finance amounted to nearly £700m in 2015, with P2P business lending in Real Estate (for mortgages and property development) taking the lion’s share: £609m – 41% of the total volume of P2P business loans in 2015.

The market volume of equity-based crowdfunding is much more modest, coming in at £87m for 2015, still a very significant sum.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 2

P2P Business Lending in Real Estate

In 2015, P2P real estate lending financed over 600 commercial and residential developments, mostly by small to medium sized property developers.

Of that hearty £609m funding sum for 2015, Real Estate P2P lending saw increased growth throughout the year:

Q1 → £120.78m

Q2 → £146.81m

Q3 → £152.96m

Q4 → £188.12m

Perhaps some of this extraordinary success has something to do with institutional funding in the P2P Real Estate lending sector? Institutional funding was around 25% in 2015, and up to 75% on some platforms.

P2P business lending for Real Estate comprises a range of financing models and products. There are the short term bridging finance loans, which run for a 12 to 18 month period. Them, there are the longer term (3-5 years) commercial and residential mortgages, and construction/development debt finance.

In 2015, the average size of P2P loans for Real Estate came in at £522,333, slightly under 2014’s £662,425 average. The figure for 2015 was more in line with the average UK house price than the previous year. This may be due to the growing use of P2P lending in funding residential and commercial mortgages, rather than the larger developments focused on in 2014.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 3

Just a quick clarification point here: regulatory constraints mean you cannot use P2P Real Estate lending for your own residential mortgage.

It’s also not a done deal to apply for a loan for a Real Estate development: in 2015, 27.5% of loan applications in P2P Real Estate lending were accepted.

The average number of lenders required to fund a typical P2P Real Estate loan? 490.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 4

Equity-Based Crowdfunding for Real Estate

This model enables investors to acquire ownership of a property asset, via the purchase of shares, either of a single property, or a number of properties as part of a portfolio.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 5

In 2015, equity-based crowdfunding for Real Estate raised a total of £87m, for 174 development projects. This is how the annual quarters looked:

Q1 → £13.09m

Q2 → £23.16m

Q3 → £35.70m

Q4 → £14.63m

Equity-based crowdfunding for Real Estate had a great year in 2015. The record for fastest funding for a development project was set: £843,100 was raised in just 10 minutes and 43 seconds, from a total of 319 investors!

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 6

Unlike P2P Real Estate lending, with equity-based crowdfunding, there is scarcely any institutional involvement. Of the 10,626 funders participating in Real Estate crowdfunding, NESTA found that only 3% were categorised as institutional investors by the platform. This contrasts with the 77% of sophisticated or high net worth investors in the model.

Yes, equity based crowdfunded property investment is much more grass roots in many ways than the P2P Real Estate sector. The recent inclination to lower minimum investment thresholds in this area, with the aim of enticing more retail investors attests to this in a very clear way.

Whilst 27.5% of loan applications in P2P Real Estate lending were accepted in 2015, in equity-based crowdfunding for Real Estate, platform acceptance rate was much lower. Only 2.9% of deals made it onto the platform, on average.

However, deal success rate for those who did make it onto the platform was pretty high: 87%. There are also far fewer investors required for an equity deal – NESTA reports an average of 150 per deal. The average deal size for 2015 in the crowdfunding sector for property was fairly high, too: £820,042.

Real Estate Alternative Finance and Manchester

Of the 58 alternative finance platforms surveyed by NESTA for their report, 62% were – unsurprisingly – London-based. However, a significant 5.2% hailed from our home city of Manchester.

Manchester is also one of a number of regional and local authorities that have either partnered with online alternative finance platforms to fund local SMEs, or have used alternative finance methods to fund community projects.

NESTA’s data shows that the most active regions receiving funds from Real Estate crowdfunding were London (of course), the North East, and the North West. The North West was also found to be one of the top 3 regions actually providing funds.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 7

This isn’t terribly surprising given the growing trend for emphasising Real Estate crowdfunding within areas in need of regeneration. Manchester has, as we know, come a very long way. The economy of the North West has been transformed over the last few years, in no small part due to the heavy investment in regeneration projects, in the form of development funding from both the public and private sectors.

It is these regeneration areas that are being identified as some of the potentially best investment opportunities. Not only do they cost investors less than prime locations, but these areas are also the ones that will experience the highest growth over coming years.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 8

Real Estate Alternative Finance and The Government

Direct investment from the government has helped support the growth of both peer-to-peer and crowdfunding markets. In 2015, £60m was lent by the British Business Bank via P2P lending platforms, specifically for SMEs.

Tax incentives have also been applied, including the EIS (Enterprise Investment Scheme) and SEIS (Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme). These schemes have been widely used, by a large proportion of investors using alternative funding platforms, and have been especially popular within the equity-based crowdfunding market.

The launch of the IFISA (Innovative Finance ISA) in April 2016 is also an exciting development in the alternative finance sector.

In particular, P2P business lending platforms for Real Estate expect the IFISA to generate a whopping 51.9% growth in transactional volume this year, whilst equity-based crowdfunding platforms for Real Estate predict 30.31% growth as a result of the IFISA.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 9

The figures for Real Estate Alternative Finance outmatch those elsewhere in the alternative finance market. P2P consumer lenders, for example, expect a 26% increase in total volume as a result of the IFISA. It’s clear that Real Estate lending stands to benefit the most.

In anticipation of the influx of retail investors expected by the onset of the IFISA, some P2P Real Estate lending platforms are even lowering their investment thresholds.

What is the IFISA?

At its most basic, the Innovative Finance ISA allows UK investors to lend money using P2P lending platforms to invest up to 100% of their £15,240 annual ISA allowance, and to receive any interest and capital gains tax-free. You can find out more here.

Institutional Investment in Real Estate Alternative Finance

Catching the scent of a good thing, institutional investors are also muscling in on the peer-to-peer real estate lending market, as they are across the alternative finance industry.

It is estimated, based on platform reporting, that in the UK in 2015, 1,031 institutional funders were at the bottom of financing loans and equity deals in alternative finance.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 10

45% of all alternative finance platforms reported institutional involvement in 2015. In 2014, this was 28%, and in 2013, just 11%.

For P2P business lending, in 2015 26% of total funding was attributable to institutional funding. In peer-to-peer Real Estate lending specifically, a total of 25% institutional funding was reported, with significant increase between the 3rd and 4th quarters of the year, in particular:

Q1 → 22%

Q2 → 22%

Q3 → 23%

Q4 → 31%

By contrast, however, in equity-based crowdfunding, 2015 saw just 8% of funding coming from institutions.

With institutional funding growing in the alternative finance market, as well as the influx of more high net worth investors, there is some discussion about whether the disruptive force of the alternative finance market is at risk of being stemmed.

Banking institutions have found themselves burdened with heavy regulatory compliance, cumbersome legacy systems and bureaucratic complexity. Since the debacle at the end of the last decade, the general populous has been hungry for new alternatives to the traditional financial system. Confidence has been lost, and – at the retail end of the investment spectrum at least – making one’s savings grow within the received systems has less potential for gains than what’s promised by alternative finance.

Alternative finance has become a key player in the development of a whole new generation of financial products. Along with a range of other FinTech solutions to saving, banking and investment, this revolutionary rumble has got the banks concerned.

It’s no wonder that, as such a disruptive movement grows, it finds itself on the precipice of being co-opted into the corporate world. But all the time that interest rates on savings accounts remain shockingly low, and first-time buyers view getting on the property ladder as likely as a winning Euromillions ticket, the prospect of a less suffocating alternative for growing money will continue to be thoroughly desirable.

And, focusing on Real Estate specifically, research conducted by Crowdstacker found that 44% of retail investors would like to increase their exposure to the UK property market, not only owning their own home, but also by investing through P2P lenders, like The House Crowd. Investor reluctance was found to centre around the time consuming nature and costs of property management, as well as affordability. The alternative finance model of crowdfunded property investment and P2P lending in Real Estate removes those factors from the equation.

2015 also saw the emergence of self-managed, platform-owned listed investment trusts, funds and vehicles: a sure sign that platforms are preparing to challenge the fund management space.

And as the alternative finance world continues to evolve, we are also seeing the emergence of a number of independent online aggregators, such as Informed Funding, FinPoint and ABF. These are rising up to provide additional channels and services for connecting business fundraisers to alternative finance platforms.

That being said, corporate interjection into the alternative finance space should not be considered a negative. It is this involvement that is allowing the industry to grow and evolve.

A number of P2P consumer lending platforms have struck high profile partnership deals with some big-name corporates.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE - QUOTE 11 - THE HOUSE CROWD

Corporate partnerships have been witnessed between alternative finance platforms and large brands such as Virgin, Amazon, Uber and Sage. As NESTA puts it, these partnerships are “fusing the traditional corporate world with the disruptive models of alternative finance”.

It is these partnerships that will aid in increasing public awareness of the alternative finance sector, but not only this. Corporate partnerships will also attract high quality borrowers, reducing default rates on P2P loans, and also offers the potential for data gathering, which will enhance the industry’s credit scoring capabilities, and inform risk management.

The increasing involvement of high net worth investors, along with institutional funding and corporate partnerships is what is allowing alternative finance to push boundaries, blur definitions, and limit the dangers of orthodoxy: it is a catalyst for rapid evolution.

Conclusion

The extraordinary growth of the industry that we have witnessed over the last few years has begun to level out.

In 2015, the UK’s alternative finance industry facilitated investments, loans and donations totalling £3.2bn. In 2014, this figure was £1.74bn – a YoY growth rate of 83.91%, which is not to be sniffed at. But when you compare this to the 161% growth between 2013 and 2014, it looks positively small.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE REPORT - QUOTE 12 - THE HOUSE CROWD

In 2014, 24 new alternative finance platforms began trading. This was down to 14 in 2015. Fewer new entrants are joining the market, whilst existing platforms continue to increase their total volumes at a steady rate.

Up until now, the industry appears to have been actively pushing its boundaries, both in its evolution, and in its rate of growth. Whilst the figures continue to be staggeringly impressive – with the market on course for a £5bn year in 2016 – plateauing figures are a good sign that the industry is maturing.

Alternative finance is coming of age with intelligence and dignity. It is listening to influential voices from big corporates, accepting helping hands where they are offered, and maintaining its grass roots persona. Most of all, however, it’s making money, not just for a few, but for a large body of investors all along the wealth spectrum. In Real Estate, it’s helping to regenerate run-down neighbourhoods, keeping a stagnant housing market moving, improving living standards across the board.

REAL ESTATE ALTERNATIVE FINANCE REPORT - QUOTE 13 - THE HOUSE CROWD

In short, alternative finance may have been a disruptive teenager, but it’s growing up to be a real force for good in the middle of a blighted financial landscape. The future of finance is looking promising.

 

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Property News Round-up 16/12/15

Property News – All The Latest Updates

Hi guys and welcome to another fortnightly edition of our property news round-up. As usual we take a look at an array of stories from the property industry, today we look at Yorkshire and the Northern Powerhouse to looking at some Christmas decorated homes (just don’t let Dave come round and put your decorations up – you’ll see why!), if you’ve been extremely busy like ourselves, they’ll hopefully give you some inspiration for when you do finally get round to putting your Christmas lights up!

 

Yorkshire Earns Its Place In The Northern Powerhouse

yorkshire northern powerhouse

In the past year the north of England has had a 30 per cent increase in construction and whilst Manchester and both Liverpool dominate, Yorkshire and Humberside are catching up with their north western rivals.

George Osborne’s Northern Powerhouse vision to give major northern cities their very own powers when it comes to planning, housing, transport, and policing, deals have already been discussed and agreed upon for Greater Manchester, Sheffield, and the North East.

However, when it comes to property, many analysts have stated that Yorkshire property growth is linked to simply supplying the housing that people want. Government schemes such as Help To Buy is one major factor that is helping to flourish “Gods Own County” when it comes to property, particularly for families who are starting out.

The county has definitely attracted people from the south, particularly from the capital, end of the day it’s no secret that you get more for your money up north compared with what you would get in the south. As the Examiner mention, the cash you part with for a two-bedroom flat in west London would get you a 10 bedroom, Grade II listed, detached house with three acres of land in Lindley, Huddersfield.

In addition, the vibrant and beautiful Yorkshire countryside and huge investment opportunities in retail, technology, and research plus its rich culture (which we mentioned about in a previous blog post).

With all these factors you can see why Yorkshire has become a crowded marketplace as it continues to compete with Manchester and Liverpool and this one reason why we have had quite a few projects in the region. If you are interested in Yorkshire, feel free to download our South Yorkshire guide.

 

Top Of The League – Manchester A Top Choice For Investors

manchester investment

Since 2010 no other place in the country has generated higher yields for property investors than the north-west city. (Select Property, December 2015).

Investors have gained annual average returns of 6.02%, compared to just 4.79% in London according to data which was generated from lending firm LendInvest.

2015 has been a great year for the city as it has cemented its place as the Northern Powerhouse leader to being named as the UK’s number one city for property investment by HSBC.

Last month a survey which was conducted by accounting firm RSM found that the north-west is the second highest UK region for overseas investment. With a vast amount of investment being poured into the Northern Powerhouse leader as well as having a huge demand for rented spaces, investors have been quick to snap up assets in the city ahead of a predicted growth curve.

 

Is The London Property Market Going To Crash?

London Property Crash

So what’s happening in the capital? To cut a long story short there’s simply too much supply and not enough demand. According to The Independent,  in the last financial quarter alone, 6,000 new apartments were finished, each costing more than £600,000. Currently there are 41,000 homes and flats under construction or being topped out in London priced at north of £1m.

People without children want to live in apartments, these include the  first buyers, buy-to-let investors, and people who’s main home is not in the capital. First-time buyers are therefore being prices out as they simply can’t afford a mortgage or afford to pay a deposit on a house.

In addition, foreign purchases from wealthy Russians and Chinese buyers has started to trickle. Vladimir Putin has put a crackdown on Russian citizens that hold cash overseas meaning that there has been less Russian buyers in London recently. Moving further east, China is also having a corruption purge as mentioned in The Independent.

So what does this all mean for the London property market? According to one property expert, it will take just one single developer not to sell, won’t be able to cover costs, and that’s when the crack will start to happen. He mentions that will be enough to send shockwaves through the market, and bring prices crashing down.

Are you looking for an alternative? If so, we recommend reading our crowdfunding process page to see if property crowdfunding is right for you.

 

Average Property Price Increases to £20,000 in 2015

stamp duty

Figures from Rightmove show that the average selling price for a home in December was £289,452, an increase of around £20,000 from the average house price a year ago. (Which, December, 2015).

The property portal mentioned that the seasonal 1.1% dip in property prices this month is the lowest December fall they have seen since 2006.

They have predicted that prices will reach new records next year and expects new seller asking prices to rise by 6% as the demand in excess of suitable supply continues.

As a result of prices remaining high in London, highly-skilled workers may look for other options and move to more affordable cities such as Manchester, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Leeds.

 

Decorated Christmas Homes – Let it Glow Let it Glow Let it Glow!

christmas lights UK

If you’re like me and leave your Christmas decorations to the last minute and if you are a big fan of Christmas lights you might want to take a look at some of the most Christmas decorated homes in the UK.

If you’re looking at decking up your front with fairy lights we think the 9th example is quite a good one to go for. If you like to go nuts with your lights and Christmas decorations how about the first example?

We’d love to see your creativity, feel free to tweet us your decorated home @TheHouseCrowd.

I hope you can do a better job than me! This is what it would look like if I was left in charge…

christmas decoration fail

 

Image Sources : Telegraph Heavy

 

What Are Your Thoughts?

Which of our chosen property stories has interested you the most? We would love to hear from you, feel free to leave us a comment on our Facebook and Google Plus pages. If you prefer to tweet us, tweet @TheHouseCrowd.

In the meantime if you want to know more about Property Crowdfunding do register for our Information Pack which will tell you all about it. 

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Property values can fall. Your capital may be at risk & returns may vary. Read our Risk Warning.

Property News Round-up 25/5/16

Property News All The Latest Updates

 

Hi guys welcome to another edition of our property news blog, today we once again look at the latest goings-on in the domestic market from looking at the average house prices in Greater Manchester in 2030 to focusing on landlords that have had a property abandoned by tenants. If you missed our last property news round-up, catch up here.

 

Average House Prices In Greater Manchester Are Set to Reach Record Levels By 2030

Property News Greater Manchester

According to new research from property search engine eMoov, the average house price in Greater Manchester is set to reach record levels by 2030.

First-time buyers will struggle even more, with an average home in the Greater Manchester area predicted to cost £316,920.

eMoov’s UK property research, which also looked at house prices from the start of the millennium to 2015 revealed that property prices had increased by 84%. This increase was then applied to every area of the country.

The only regions offering house prices below £280,000 are Merseyside at £275,074, East Riding of Yorkshire at £277,411 and County Durham at £279,985.

eMoov created a map (view here) which illustrates just how dangerous this current artificial inflation of the market could be in the long run (as mentioned in a previous article by eMoov’s CEO Russell Quirk), and the worrying thing is that it isn’t just the capital that will go beyond the average reach for these seeking to get on the property ladder.

 

Direct Foreign Investment Levels In Manchester Are Currently At A 10-Year High

Property News Manchester Investment

 

According to Select Property Group 98 project deals were struck in the north-west in 2015, with the growth contributing to a 190% increase in new jobs across the region in just 12 months.

Key foreign investor focus included :- software, business services, construction and retail markets. In addition, it was revealed that investment from US funds was the north-west’s number one source of FDI projects, followed by European nations the Netherlands, Germany and France.

Manchester is the leading city in the north west according to the latest EY UK Attractiveness survey. Increased investment from foreign investors plus job growth in the city and the region have risen by 190% over the past year.

 

More Than Half Of UK Home Buyers Rent Before They Can Buy A Property

Property News

Some 64% of aspiring home owners in the UK rent a property before they pick up the keys to their very own home, new research has found. (Property Wire, May 2016)

Saving for a deposit remains one of the biggest financial hurdles facing first time buyers and research from Clydesdale and Yorkshire Banks found that renters are less likely to benefit from help from family, with only 41% receiving any financial assistance, compared to 62% of those who are living with their parents or family members.

Our very own research last year on millennials showed that Generation Y feel that UK property is so out of reach that 23% say they will have to wait until they inherit money before they can get on the property ladder, also, 36% of those surveyed said they felt they’d have to rent forever.

Another sobering piece of research, this time conducted by Royal London, almost five million renters in the UK have no plans in place to cover their rent if they became too ill to earn for three months or more, even though recent cuts to housing benefits could leave them at risk (as mentioned in this Property Wire article).

Are you looking for an alternative? If you are a part-time/ novice investor who does not have a deposit available or the ability to get a mortgage, property crowdfunding might be for you. Why not take a look at how the process works here.

 

Britain’s ‘Property Premier League’ Locations With The Highest House Prices

Property News Property Premier League

Leicester might have been crowned 15/16 Barclays Premier League Champions but when it comes to the ‘Property Premier League’ the Foxes sit in 8th place whilst Chelsea win the Property League title with the highest average house prices (£1,152,137!), however, it is not all good news for the Stamford Bridge side as luxury properties prices in the area saw a significant slowdown this year which brought the average value down with it.

So how did our Manchester clubs get on? United finished the property season in 11th place – the M16 post code saw a hefty drop since the season kicked off back in August. Moving to The Etihad, City ended their property season in 16th place. The Citizens had the biggest house price drop on the whole list, by almost 6%.

Despite sitting in the lower ends of the table, both Manchester sides would finish top if the league was based on achieving higher rental yields for investors. The average rental yield in Manchester is at 6.02%.

At The House Crowd unfortunately we can’t help your club crowdfund the next Mourinho or Pep Guardiola but we can offer you some free handy Manchester guides (North and Central).

 

A Third of Landlords Have Had A Property Abandoned By Tenants

Property News Landlords

 

Some 36% of UK landlords have had a property abandoned by tenants, according to research. (Letting Agent Today, May, 2016)

The National Landlords Association (NLA) study revealed abandonment can be very costly for landlords especially when there is an outstanding amount of rent owned.

The NLA’s data shows that the issue is most prevalent in the North East, where 58% of landlords surveyed said they have had a property abandoned.

In contrast, the lowest recorded region for having properties abandoned was in the South West with 31%. In London 33% of landlords experienced similar issues.

The Housing and Planning Act – which includes measures to tackle tenants abandoning properties, will come as a  huge relief to landlords up and down the country.

 

What Are Your Thoughts?

Which of our chosen property stories has interested you the most? We would love to hear from you, feel free to leave us a comment on our Facebook and Google Plus pages. If you prefer to tweet us, tweet @TheHouseCrowd.

In the meantime if you want to know more about Property Crowdfunding do register for our Information Pack which will tell you all about it. 

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Property News Round-up 23/3/16

Property News All The Latest Updates

 

Hi guys welcome to our fortnightly property news blog, as usual we will be taking a look at the latest domestic news and will be taking a look back at last week’s budget to taking a tour of a fairy tale castle in Greater Manchester – can you guess the property’s price tag? If you missed our previous property news round-up catch up here.

 

Budget 2016: What It Means For The Property Industry

George Osborne Budget 2016

Last week George Osborne made a number of announcements in his 2016 Budget that will affect the property industry here in the UK.

The chancellor, (as quite a few were expecting) did not take a u-turn with regards to the additional stamp duty rate. So what does this mean exactly? In a nutshell, it means an extra 3% levy on top of normal stamp duty rates if you buy multiple properties.

In addition, he also scrapped the “slab” system for tax rates on commercial property purchases. According to the IBT, the reform now works like income tax, with the rate only applied to the portion of the property price that falls into its bracket. He also raised rates in the top price brackets and cut them at the lower end. Moreover, only 9% of commercial property purchasers will pay more.

Mr. Osborne also cut Capital Gains Tax (CGT) rates. On the day it was announced that the higher rate will reduce from 28% to 20% and the basic rate from 18% to 10%. If you’re thinking there has to be a catch there, you’ve hit the nail on the head. The catch is the former rates will still apply for sales of residential property. It’s worth noting that Capital Gains Tax is not applied to profit made on your own home. However, if you own any additional properties then CGT does apply to you. This is bad news if you are a landlord as you will be penalised if you decide to sell. This doesn’t apply to all types of property investors. For example, people who have invested via funds will benefit from lower CGT rates on the profits they make.

On the day it was also revealed that property developers must pay tax on their profits. In addition, the HM Revenue and Customs will bring together a task force for targeting offshore developers in the UK. It has been reported so far that the tax office has identified 100 “high risk” developments.

The government stated in the budget that it will work closely with local councils to identify where they can be given more “planning freedoms” to ensure thousands of new homes are built. Additional financial support will be given to councils that plan to build houses on the outskirts of towns and cities (aka garden villages) which consist of 1,500 to 10,000 homes.

Lastly, it was announced that money will be going to the homeless. Osbourne’s budget said that £115m being put towards helping rough sleepers. The majority of the homeless spending will go towards low-cost ‘second stage’ accommodation. However, while many homelessness charities welcomed the government funding, they stressed that the problems run far deeper than a shortage of money.

What are your thoughts on the budget? What other changes would have you liked to have seen Mr. Osborne include on the day?

Image Source : Liverpool Echo

Northern Cities Are Among The Best Places To Invest In Property

Liverpool Property Invest

Northern cities are the hottest up-and-coming areas for UK property investors, according to data released today on affordable homes. (City AM, March 2016)

Research from Which? shows that where property prices are surging, thaey also have an average house price below £200,000.

Liverpool’s city centre takes the top spot for when it comes to affordability. Land Registry data indicates that the average home in the L1 postcode still costs just £120,000 despite house prices increasing 41 per cent over the past year.

Other areas that have seen strong price rises but remain affordable include Bradford’s BD1 postcode which is east of the city’s university.

Manchester’s M12 postcode came fifth on the affordable list with an average house price of £98,000, the area is cheaper than Liverpool’s central district, however prices rises from this postcode have not been as dramatic, rising at 32 per cent.

Are you interested in investing in the north? If so why not check out our guides on Manchester (North and Central) and also our South Yorkshire guide.

 

Property Prices In Manchester Increased Over 30% In 2015

North of England Property Invest

Staying in the north and looking at property prices a little bit more closer to home (part two of the above if you like), Salford’s M5 postcode recorded the region’s highest rises, with the average value of £127,890 representing growth of 34% in just 12 months.

As Select Property Group mention in one of their recent articles, 2015 was a year in which Manchester firmly established itself as a property investment hotspot. It was named by HSBC as the UK’s number one city for yields, with rental rates being driven by one of the lowest levels of housing supply and a population growing at three times the national average.

Investors have started to whet their appetite when it comes to investing in Manchester due to the fact it has one of the country’s youngest populations, with 60% more 25 to 29-year-olds living in the city. The millennial generation (aka Generation Y) are known for renting and with a vast amount of graduates and others relocating for jobs, Manchester is currently a prime place for property investors.

 

London Property Prices Rose Almost £500 A Day In January

London Property Prices

Moving from the north to travelling ‘down sarf’- London house prices increased by almost £500 a day in January, according to government figures that provide fresh evidence of a “two-speed” property market. (Guardian, March 2016).

Data from the ONS (office for National Statistics) indicates that London and the South East are still dominating and continue to power ahead with double-digit annual growth rates. In contrast, in other regions of the UK such as in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland figures appear to have stuttered to a halt.

According to the ONS, The average London house price hit a record £551,000. This was £15,000 up on December’s figure of £536,000 and an increase of £484 a day.

Dragonfly Property Finance’s managing director Mark Posniak told The Guardian : “This latest annual house price data once again throws into sharp relief the contrast between the housing markets of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. They may be geographical neighbours but they could be thousands of miles apart in terms of house prices.”

 

Fairy Tale ‘Castle’ In Greater Manchester – Can You Guess Its Price Tag?

Manchester Castle

Want to become lord or lady of the manor? Here’s your chance (if you’ve got a LOT of spare cash lying around that is!) Wharmton Tower, in Grasscroft (Oldham) has eleven bedrooms, a separate coach house and even a stone-built summer house – and is just a short drive from Manchester!

Grasscoft has some well-known residents such as Paul Scholes and Dr. Brian Cox and is ideal for those who love to live in a relaxed and quiet surrounding. BUT to live this life of luxury how much will it cost you?

 

How Much Does The Fairy Tale ‘Castle’ In Greater Manchester Cost?

 
pollcode.com free polls

Image Source : Manchester Evening News

What Are Your Thoughts?

Which of our chosen property stories has interested you the most? We would love to hear from you, feel free to leave us a comment on our Facebook and Google Plus pages. If you prefer to tweet us, tweet @TheHouseCrowd.

In the meantime if you want to know more about Property Crowdfunding do register for our Information Pack which will tell you all about it. 

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Property News Round-up 10/2/16

Property News: All The Latest Updates

Hi guys and welcome to our fortnightly property news edition, today we look at an array of news items from the domestic market from the average home in Britain will cost over a £1 million to looking at the strangest estate agent photos ever taken! In the last property news blog post in our quiz we asked asked about what is all the property in the world worth? The answer was B $217,000,000,000,000!

Average Home In Britain To Cost Over £1 Million By 2032

UK Property

According to research by the Lib Dems, the average home in Britain will increase from £290,000 to £1.017 million in 2032.

Party leader Tim Farron mentioned in The Telegraph that a child born on the day of the debate faces the prospect of paying at least a million for a home to call their own.

He stressed that relying on the “Bank of Mum and Dad” isn’t an ideal option for everyone, and as a result, it puts a monumental amount of pressure to millions of families who have worked hard and done the right thing.

The Lib Dems research revealed that the average property price in the UK will reach £650,000 within the next ten years, which is an increase of £360,000 on today’s average price.

Farron’s solution, as mentioned in The International Business Times (IBT) is that we need new garden cities, allowing councils to build housing stock, and bring thousands of empty homes back into use.

So how did the political party come to this frightening property statistic? They looked at trends from National Statistics figures showing house price inflation for the past three years. Whether you agree or disagree with their research, it remains apparent that no matter what way you look at the property situation in the UK, we have a crisis on our hands. Again, whether the 1.017 million is accurate or has been hyperbolised, we need to look at alternative ways to get us out of this property black hole.

 

Yorkshire Property Investment Market On The Rise

Yorkshire Commercial Property

According to new research published by the national commercial property consultancy Lambert Smith Hampton (LSH), investment in commercial property in Yorkshire and the Humber increased by 11% in 2015.

Their research claims that a total of £1.765bn was invested in the region in 2015, with £189m of this coming in Q4. However, Q4 saw a fall in deals completed of nearly 30%, 31 compared to 44 in 2014.

The director of agency and investment at Lambert Smith Hampton Bill Lynn told BDaily that: “Despite a reduction in Q4, the figures for Yorkshire and the Humber are nonetheless positive, with an 11% growth in 2015 as a whole. This is something that is mirrored in other regions across the country and shows the continued strength of the investment market in virtually every sector. The indication for 2016 is that supply is robust and a strong year is expected.” (BDaily, January 2016).

The demand for hotels, student accommodation and healthcare (alternative assests) seen in Yorkshire also occurred nationally and was a key driver of activity during 2015, investment also increased to £14.8bn over the year, 53% above 2014’s total.

Are you thinking about investing in property in Yorkshire? If so, why not check out our South Yorkshire guide to help you get started, click here to access.

 

Manchester Leads The Way As Commercial Property Investment Hits £1.2bn

manchester commercial property

Leading commercial property information provider CoStar Group research shows that a total £67.5 bn was invested in UK commercial property last year, making it the second strongest year on record and 46 per cent above the 10-year average.

Manchester as we know has been centred around the Northern Powerhouse concept and in addition it was the first city to receive ‘City Deal’ funding and regional devolution.

Being centred around the Northern Powerhouse and having a demand in office space has made Manchester a very lucrative place for investors. As a result, investment in commercial property in the city hit a total of £1.2bn in 2015, a three per cent increase on the £992m recorded in 2014.

Manchester commercial property should continue to attract investment as many investors are looking for an alternative to London. Are you interested in property investment in Manchester? Why not check out our very own Manchester guides (North and Central).

Image Source : Manchester Evening News

Northern Ireland Sees Sharpest Rise In Building Of New Houses In UK

Northern Ireland Property

The National House Building Council revealed that there was a 30% increase in registered new homes, from 2,487 to 3,223 last year in the province.

One Northern Ireland based housebuilder said 2015 had seen the biggest number of developments come up for tender since the housing crash. (Belfast Telegraph, January 2016)

However, the National House Building Council claimed that Northern Ireland’s increase came “from a relatively low base” because house-building slumped so drastically during the economic downturn.

One managing director of a property firm from Northern Ireland mentioned that they faced barriers to house-building that were not present in England. These barriers included sewer bonds, gold-plating of EU regulations and demands to upgrade underfunded infrastructure and services.

The managing director went on to say that despite these barriers they have found ways of overcoming them, in addition, one representative stated : “In general, builders are now more confident about prospects for house-building and this optimism is shared by potential buyers.” (Belfast Telegraph, January 2016)

Richard Ramsey, the Ulster Bank chief economist said the house-building recovery in Northern Ireland still has a very long way to go, though picking-up from the downturn was welcome news.

Image Source : Property Pal

It’s Gone All A Bit Pete Tong In London! The Strangest Estate Agent Photos Ever Taken

Property Fails

A collection of the strangest photos taken by people attempting to shift properties around London has been made showing just how little they’re trying as ITV News points out.

The bizarre photos have been put together by a man called Andy Donaldson who stumbled upon the images whilst he was looking to buy a flat.

From a cluttered bedroom with a bunch of chairs stuffed together to an all in one shower toilet with a washing machine next to it!

Want to see more of these property fails? Click here.

Fortunately our very own property investments are fail free so you won’t find any toilets in kitchens or doors fitted in the wrong places! Check out our latest investments here.

Image Source : ITV News

What Are Your Thoughts?

Which of our chosen property stories has interested you the most? We would love to hear from you, feel free to leave us a comment on our Facebook and Google Plus pages. If you prefer to tweet us, tweet @TheHouseCrowd.

In the meantime if you want to know more about Property Crowdfunding do register for our Information Pack which will tell you all about it. 

Register Now For More Information

 

Property values can fall. Your capital may be at risk & returns may vary. Read our Risk Warning