Apache Capital Partners Fund 466 Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester

Apache Capital Partners Fund 466 Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester

Property investment management firm, Apache Capital Partners, has teamed with Moda Living to secure senior debt financing of £85m, secured on the Angel Gardens development in Manchester city centre. The development will create 466 private rental sector homes in Manchester.

Deutsche Pfandbriefbank has agreed to a four-year term funding contract for the construction period of the development, which will convert to an investment loan for the rest of the term. The development is set to cost a total of £153m. Completion of the project is set for 2020.

The premium private rental sector apartments will stand 34 storeys tall, making it one of the tallest residential towers built outside London since the 2008 crash. Covering 520,000 sq ft, the Angel Gardens development forms part of the NOMA redevelopment project, regenerating a 20-acre site opposite Manchester’s Victoria station.

Angel Gardens and Beyond…

Angel Gardens, however, is not the only private rental sector delivered by the joint venture between Apache and Moda Living. It will be the first of many private rental sector developments created by the venture. In the pipeline is a total of 5,000 new private rental sector homes across eight cities across the UK, including London and the south east.

Johnny Caddick, managing director at Moda Living, believes the project will “set new expectations for rental housing in Manchester and throughout the UK”.

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Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester: On Trend

Investing in property in Manchester is becoming a real trend for high profile investors. And the private rental sector is hot property, considering the vast increase in those seeking rental accommodation. It is mainly the young professionals, who are flocking to the city for its huge career opportunities, that make up the bulk of renters in the city. Angel Gardens will be ideally placed for the many employed in the NOMA area, as well as those commuting into Manchester Victoria.

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An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

Traditionally, only those with access to large amounts of capital have been able to invest in the lucrative world of property. Managing a portfolio is normally time-consuming, business, which becomes increasingly more burdensome as the investor’s portfolio becomes larger.

However, in the last few years, a new method of property investment has emerged which has effectively democratised the entire investment process, allowing more people than ever to benefit from the financial gains that property investment can offer.

Property crowdfunding sprung onto the scene in 2012, and is now worth billions of dollars a year worldwide. The value of the industry currently doubles every two months, and is set to be worth $250bn by 2020.

The growth of the property crowdfunding industry has been catalysed, in part, by the relaxation of regulations over the last few years. The Government has identified the industry as being hugely beneficial to the economy, and has also begun investing in crowdfunding itself. Institutional investment is also coming into play at an increasing rate, and high net worth investors, attracted by the simplicity of the process, and the returns available, are also investing through property crowdfunding.

But why is investing in property crowdfunding proving so popular?

Offering the chance to build a diverse portfolio without all the legwork involved in traditional property investment models, and with the opportunity for significant gains, it’s no surprise that investing in property crowdfunding has grown exponentially in the last few years.

What’s more, as interest rates on savings continue to crawl along the seabed, and returns from both rental and sales continue to rise, more and more people are waking up to crowdfunding as a simple way to grow their money.

How Does It Work?

Property crowdfunding encompasses both equity investments and debt based investment (also known as peer to peer secured lending).

The concept itself is relatively simple.

Equity investments involve a group of people pooling their cash to buy a property as shareholders through a ‘Special Purpose Vehicle’ (SPV). The SPV is a limited company, set up solely for the purchase of that property. The SPV handles all the work, fees and maintenance of the property, whilst the shareholders receive their proportion of the rental yields, and/or share of capital gains when the property is sold.

People can invest even very small sums in buying shares in the property. On some platforms, this is as low as £50, but the average is between £500 and £1000 as a minimum. You can (and should) spread your investment sum over a number of different properties across the crowdfunding platform, to mitigate risk.

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Getting started is a very quick and easy process. You simply register on your chosen website – it is an FCA requirement that only registered and accredited investors may participate, and, once registered, you simply select the properties you wish to invest in.

Debt based investments again involve pooling resources, in this instance, to make micro loans through the platform to a third party borrower. The loan as a whole is secured against the borrower’s property and the platform appoints an agent to act on behalf of lenders and take any necessary enforcement action. These types of investment are usually short term (up to 12 months, and pay a fixed rate of interest with no capital growth).

Where Did It Start?

The House Crowd is the longest-established property crowdfunding platform. It began trading in 2012 and offers both debt and equity investments. Since then, other companies have followed in their footsteps, such as Property Moose in 2013, and Property Partner and Crowdlords in 2014. The industry continues to expand, with several new platforms emerging each year.

Is It Regulated?

Property crowdfunding firms are all regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which ensures that platforms are managed properly, and that risks are made completely clear to investors. As with any investment, there is risk to capital – but it’s worth comparing this risk against other investment classes, and seeing how property crowdfunding stacks up.

Before investing through property crowdfunding platforms, it is very important to do your research. Every regulated platform should have the FCA authorisation number clearly visible on their website. If you can’t find these details, it’s probably best to steer clear: without this regulation they are operating illegally.

Is It The Right Choice For Me?

As with any investment, you need to take into account your personal circumstances to establish whether it is the right one for you.

You can find out more about establishing whether property crowdfunding is the right investment for you here.

Ask yourself what you wish to achieve. Investors with a lot of professional experience and access to bank funding, may find the model less appealing than those who novice.

If, on the other hand, you don’t have a deposit available, or aren’t able to get a mortgage, then investing through property crowdfunding could be an ideal way for you to access this asset class. And, given the government’s recent attacks on landlords, which has severely undermined the profitability and viability of buy-to-let investing for individual investors, it may well be that crowdfunding remains the only sensible option available for most.

Risk

The same principles that apply to other forms of property investment also apply to crowdfunding. You should be aware that capital growth profits are speculative, and investing in properties that produce a healthy cash flow is key for minimising risk.

One of the major risks associated with cash flow positive properties is that of damage or non-payment of rent. As such, you should always factor this in as an eventuality that may affect your yields. As mentioned above, however, if you have a well-diversified portfolio, with your capital spread over several properties, any losses due to one bad tenant will be more bearable than if you had all your eggs in one basket.

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At the end of the day, it all comes down to your risk tolerance. You do lose a large amount of leverage by investing through property crowdfunding, and you will only benefit proportionately from the property’s capital growth but, at the same time, having no borrowing means significantly less risk as there are no mortgage payments and no danger of the property being repossessed (as shareholders own it outright).

If making crowdfunded debt-based investment, (aka peer to peer lending) you need to know what would happen if the borrower defaults and does not repay the loan. You should ask questions about how your investment would be protected, what happens in the event of a default – how easy is it to take control of the secured property? – and how much equity is available to enable you to recover your money should the worst happen. Unless there is sufficient equity in the property, you could risk losing some or all of your money.

You should ask questions about how your investment would be protected, what happens in the event of a default – how easy is it to take control of the secured property? – and how much equity is available to enable you to recover your money should the worst happen. Unless there is sufficient equity in the property, you could risk losing some or all of your money.

If you opt for debt-based investments, your investment will be secured by a legal charge. A critical matter to consider is at what LTV the loan is made. If, for example, a loan is made at ‘75% LTV’, it means that you will be at risk of losing some of your capital if the borrower defaults, the property has to be seized, and is sold for less than 75% of its current valuation.

Debt investments are generally considered to be lower risk than equity investments, as lenders are always paid out before shareholders, however, you do not get the potential upside of capital growth.

What About If I Want Out of My Investment?

If you need a liquid asset, then property is not the best choice.

Investing through property crowdfunding facilitates liquidity to some degree as it may be easier to sell shares in a property than the whole property. However, there is never any guarantee that you will be able to find a buyer, and, fi you cannot do so, you will have to wait until the property is sold.

Some platforms will help you to find a buyer after the expiry of a minimum term, but you should check the small print before you invest. If you’re looking for a short term investment, P2P secured lending may be the better option.

To Conclude

We hope that this has offered you some valuable insight into getting started investing through property crowdfunding. Of course, you should know everything about the ins and outs of any investment before you part with your money, and we are fully committed to helping you know all you need to.

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If you have any questions, you can always get in touch with us and we will be very happy to fill you in.

Traditional Property Investment versus Property Crowdfunding

Traditional Property Investment versus Property Crowdfunding

Property crowdfunding and traditional property investment have some significant differences. The main difference is to be found in the ease of management.

Whilst those who favour traditional property investment value the sense of control associated with full ownership of a property, along with the costs and time involved in maintaining their investment, others simply do not have the time, nor the resources, to keep up with the demands of a property.

There are also additional financial implications to consider, and we will go into these in this article.

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Responsibility

Property crowdfunding eliminates many of the responsibilities involved with traditional property investment. An investor wishing to create a properly diversified portfolio of properties will invest large sums on a smaller range of properties, and will be responsible for everything from biological disruptions (by infestation of plant or animal life), to managing tenants and weathering void periods on a rental property. With a crowdfunded property investment, none of these aspects apply, as they are taken care of by a third party.

Find out more by registering here.

Furthermore, the due diligence, prequalification and vetting of an investment property are all handled by the SPV (Special Purpose Vehicle), the company behind the purchase property.

If, on the other hand, you have the skills and experience necessary to avoid mistakes and handle the investment on your own, then traditional property investment is a lucrative and engaging way to grow your money. That being said, you will need substantially more money in the first place in order to make your first investment purchase, which is not something that all those wishing to invest in property have to hand.

Fees and Costs

There’s also the matter of fees. A traditional property investor will have to contend with solicitors’ fees, mortgage broker fees, loan arrangement fees, and surveyor charges, for example. With property crowdfunding, these fees are included within the overall cost required to sell the property, as listed on the crowdfunding platform’s website.

It’s also worth learning from the mistakes many property investors made ahead of the 2008 property crash. Many found that their mortgage lenders had allowed them to leverage at a rate that exceeded their affordability. The banks then revalued people’s assets, leading to a swathe of repossessions, subsequent catastrophic loss, and bankruptcies.

Checking the small print and getting legal advice when investing with the traditional property investment model is wise. Then again, none of this applies to property crowdfunding.

This is, of course, a worst-case scenario for traditional property investors. It is, nonetheless, one that still bears some weight. If mortgage rates rise, those who have invested with a mortgage may find themselves out of pocket. Buy-to-let investors should take the obvious step of making sure that their monthly rental income covers, at the very least, their mortgage repayments. However, they may also benefit from factoring in potential mortgage rate rises.

Find out more about our current property investment options.

Buy-to-let landlords have also been hit by changes in Government legislation that have removed the ability for these landlords to deduct interest from profits from their tax liability, which can prove a further obstacle to ensuring the profitability of their investment. Again, there are no such risks with property crowdfunding.

Challenges and Rewards

Whilst there are challenges involved with investing in property in the traditional manner, there are also a great many rewards. First of all, rather than earning a percentage of returns based on your initial investment sum (as with crowdfunding), once all outgoings (such as loans and legal fees, for example) have been taken into account, an outright property investor will earn a potentially much higher return.

There is, however, a downside to this. Where a traditional investor leverages a lot of cash, the risks to the investment are increased dramatically. Should the investment value fall, they could stand to lose a very significant amount. Whilst risk is, of course, not negated with property crowdfunding, no mortgage is necessary.

Selling Your Investment

Another benefit of traditional property investment is the control over when to sell the investment. If you are able to sell at a profit, and as quickly as you require, then the power resides within your hands. Property crowdfunding, on the other hand, requires a majority vote from all shareholders if you wish to sell before the end of the investment term.

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To Conclude

Property investment, whether traditional or crowdfunded, has long been a profitable investment choice. Whilst both forms of investment carry risk, there are significant pros and cons on both sides, which potential investors need to factor into their investment decision.

Weighing up which type of property investment is right for your particular needs is key to ensuring that you are confident in where you have placed your money. At the end of the day, however, whichever path to property investment you choose, there is potential for great returns.

Property Crowdfunding: Is It The Right Investment For Me?

Property Crowdfunding: Is It The Right Investment For Me?

Property crowdfunding is becoming an ever-more popular way for people to invest in property, often with significantly less money than investing the traditional way. However, before you jump in, it’s a good idea to assess whether this is the right investment choice for you and your circumstances.

You can view our current property investment options here.

What Do You Want To Achieve?

The first question to ask yourself when considering property crowdfunding is what you wish to achieve from your investment.

If you are looking for an investment that requires less ongoing attention than owning a property for either development or rental, or you personally have more faith in the property market than the stock market, then it could be right for you. Nonetheless, plenty of investors in property welcome the sense of control that owning a property outright brings.

Though there is more additional financial outlay involved in the purchase and maintenance of a property owned this way, some people would rather be involved in all aspects of their investment than leave it to another party.

You can find out more by registering here.

What Experience in Property Investment Do You Have?

This follows on to the second question you need to ask. How experienced are you as a property investor?

If you’ve been a full-time, outright property investor for some time, and have access to the bank funding required to own and develop a property yourself, then property crowdfunding may be less appealing.

For those who know how the market works, and perhaps already have all the necessary contacts they need for the properties they invest in, benefitting from more of the profits (after paying off loans), as opposed to their share percentage, may be a more attractive investment option.

If none of this applies to you, then take a look at your circumstances.

What Are Your Circumstances?

For novice or less experienced investors, or those who have less access to bank funding, then property crowdfunding can offer an opportunity to invest in property that is unavailable through other means. For those who are interested in the prospect of weathering the risks of property investment, rather than earning scarcely any interest on their savings accounts, again, property crowdfunding may offer an alternative path.

Whenever you consider an investment, whichever form this may take, you need to ensure that you are covered in the event that the investment takes a turn for the worst. You should only ever invest what you can afford, so make sure your calculations are correct, and you won’t cause yourself financial harm if, for any reason, the value of your investment falls.

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To Conclude

As a final note, if you decide to invest in property crowdfunding, there is further investigation to be undertaken. You will need to choose the right crowdfunding platform. It is very important to do your research, and to only settle on the platform that meets all your needs and requirements. Make sure they are regulated by the FCA, that they have a good reputation, and that their customer service and complaints procedures meet your standards.

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Entrusting your money with any investment vehicle is a decision that should never be made lightly. Ensuring that you are confident with all aspects of the investment is crucial, including the issue of risk. Property crowdfunding is no different to most other investment types, in that there is always a risk of loss. Knowing everything you can, and choosing the right investment for you, is the key to investing happily, smartly, and – hopefully – profitably.

 

Continued Increase in UK Property Demand Great News for Investors

Continued Increase in UK Property Demand Great News for Investors

In unsurprising news, RICS has announced that UK housing demand continues to increase. November’s figures show an increase in buyer enquiries by 3% over the previous month (up to 13% in November from 10% in October).

This demonstrates a third consecutive month of increases in the number of prospective buyers on the UK housing market.

“Although there are some signs that the numbers may begin to edge upwards in the new year,” says RICS Chief Economist, Simon Robinsohn. “The combination of macro uncertainty, the on-going supply shortfall, with stock levels around historic lows, and the myriad of tax changes impacting on buyers suggest that any pick-up in activity will be relatively modest. This is significant not just for the housing market itself but also for the wider economy given how much of consumer spending is tied in with home purchases.”

There are no signs that the current UK housing shortage is likely to ease off any time soon. New sales instructions rose from minus 3% to zero in the same period. Seller numbers, therefore, are slightly higher, but not enough to meet the continually strong demand.

Where there is a discrepancy between the sales market and buyer market like this, it implies that more people are either moving direct from rental accommodation, or are first time buyers. The buy-to-let market, however, is still strong, despite stamp duty hikes and tax changes implemented at the start of the 2016-17 tax year.

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UK Property Demand Rises Pleases Investors

All of this, of course, is great news for property investors. With such high demand for housing, and the value of properties still on the rise (albeit less so than in earlier months of the year), the chances of significant gains, in buy-to-let, new development or ‘flips’, are looking good.

Most of the UK is continuing to see an increase in prices, particularly in the North West, where the market is booming. Week after week, we are seeing fresh reports of the continuing rise in popularity of properties in the Manchester area.

This is, in part, due to heavy investment in development of the city’s infrastructure, and an influx of businesses relocating to the area.  These new businesses, bringing fresh jobs to the North West, are further increasing demand, particularly in the rental sector, as young professionals continue to find promising careers in the region.

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Glossary of Property Investment Terms

There are a lot of terms unique to the investment world that will be new to those just embarking on building a property portfolio. That’s why we thought it would be very useful for you to have a thorough Glossary of Property Investment Terms to help you to thoroughly understand some of the finer points of investing. We hope you find it useful!

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

A Shares 

A class of shares which have specific rights attached to them, as set out in a company’s articles of association.

Angel Investors

Investors who provide investment and other support to early-stage businesses. Traditionally angels are wealthy individuals who have a significant amount of entrepreneurial, industry or investment experience.

Angel Network (or Angel Syndicate)

A group of angel investors that pool together money and other resources to invest in, and provide support to, early-stage businesses.

Annualised Return

Average return each year over the minimum term, based on the total of rental income and estimated capital growth.

Find out more about Annualised Returns here.

Articles of Association

A company document that sets out its management and administrative structure.

The articles dictate the internal affairs of the company such as director and shareholder rights, the issue and transfer of shares, and the organisation of meetings.

Asset Class

A class of economic property that has similar characteristics. Listed shares, government bonds and real estate are all asset classes.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

B Shares

A class of shares which have specific rights attached to them, as set out in the company’s articles of association.

Below Market Value (BMV)

Properties are sometimes sold at below the market value, meaning they are offered at lower prices than comparable properties.

Beneficial Shareholder / Owner

An investor who owns the economic value and other shareholder benefits attached to shares, such as dividends and tax reliefs, but the registered title to their shares is held with another person or entity often for administrative convenience.

Bridging Finance

Bridging loans are a short-term funding option. They are used to ‘bridge’ a gap between a debt coming due – primarily for property transactions – and the main line of credit becoming available. Alternatively, they can act as a short-term loan in pressing circumstances.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Capital Employed  

The sum of shareholders’ equity and debt liabilities; can be simplified as Total Assets – Current Liabilities.

Capital Growth

The increase in value of an asset or investment over time, measured on the basis of the current value of the asset or investment, in relation to the amount originally invested in it.

Convertible Equity

An equity investment where money is invested in a company in exchange for shares to be issued at a later date. The share issue is generally triggered by the company raising finance from other investors. In return for investing early, the convertible equity investors receive a discount on the price of the shares issued to the other investors.

Convertible Note

A debt investment where money is invested in a company with the expectation that the debt will “convert” into shares issued at a later date. The share issue is generally triggered by the company raising finance from other investors. Before the conversion, the investor is paid interest.

Crowdfunding

The funding of projects or ventures by raising money from a large number of people, usually online. The three main types of crowdfunding are equity, debt and rewards/donations.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Damp Proof Course (DPC)

A barrier through the structure by capillary action such as through a phenomenon known as rising damp.

Debt

Money owed by one person/company to another. The borrower has to repay the money at a later date and generally also has to pay interest.

Dilution

A reduction in the ownership percentage of a share in a company caused by the issue of new shares.

Diversification

An investment strategy that involves mixing the amount, values and kinds of investments within a portfolio to spread risk and minimise losses.

Dividend

A dividend is a distribution of a portion of a company’s earnings, decided by the board of directors, to a class of its shareholders. Dividends can be issued as cash payments, as shares of stock, or other property.

Dividend Distribution

The distribution of a portion of a company’s profits to investors.

Drag-Along Right

A contractual obligation that allows majority shareholders to force minority shareholders to join in the sale of a company on the same terms, valuation and conditions of the majority shareholders.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS)

A UK tax scheme offering income tax and capital gains tax reliefs to qualifying private investors who invest in eligible businesses.

Equity

Shares or other securities that represent an ownership interest in a company.

Equity Crowdfunding

A type of crowdfunding that enables multiple investors to a buy shares, or other equity interests, in a company, usually through an online process.

Exit

An event when investors may be able to cash in and sell their shares, such as an initial public offering (IPO) or trade sale.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

FENSA Certificate

Documentary evidence that the installation work has been self-certified to comply with the Building Regulations

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)

The financial services regulatory body in the UK, formerly called the Financial Services Authority (FSA).

Fully Diluted

All the shares of a company in issue, plus all shares which are the subject of options or other contractual rights to be issued in the future (regardless of whether the right has vested).

Fund  

An investment opportunity that seeks to raise money to be invested across multiple businesses. Fund campaigns are commonly used to invest in businesses participating in accelerator programmes and competition winners.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Gas Safety Certificate

By law, landlords must have all gas appliances serviced regularly, normally once a year, by a Gas Safe registered engineer.

Gross Development Value (GDV)

The estimated value that a property, or new development, would fetch on the open market if it were to be sold in the current economic climate.

Gross Rate of Return

The total rate of return on an investment before deduction of any fees or expenses. The gross rate of return is quoted over a specific period of time, such as a month, quarter or year. It is often quoted as the rate of return on an investment in marketing materials.

Growth-Stage

The stage that a business is at when it has passed its ‘seed’ or initial stage and has established proof of concept and looking to grow.

Gross Yield

The yield on an investment before the deduction of taxes and expenses (such as management fees and maintenance costs). Gross yield is expressed in percentage terms. It is calculated as the annual return on an investment prior to taxes and expenses divided by the current price of the investment.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

High Net Worth Investor (HNWI)

A classification used by the financial services industry to denote an individual, or a family, with high net worth. If you earn more than £100,000 a year or have net assets of more than £250,000, you may qualify as a High Net Worth Investor.

HMO (House in Multiple Occupation)

A house occupied by more than two qualifying persons, being persons who are not all members of the same family. A “qualifying person” is a person whose only or principal place of residence is the HMO.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Initial Public Offering (IPO)

The first time that a company’s shares are available for public purchase by means of a listing on a stock exchange. This process is also known as ’going public’ or ‘floating’.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Know Your Client (KYC)

The regulatory process that financial services firms and certain other businesses must perform to verify the identity of their customers to help prevent against money laundering and other financial crimes.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Loan to Value (LTV)

A term commonly used by banks and building societies to represent the ratio of the first mortgage lien as a percentage of the total appraised value of real property. For instance, if someone borrows £130,000 to purchase a house worth £150,000, the LTV ratio is £130,000 to £150,000 or £130,000/£150,000, or 87%. The remaining 13% represent the lender’s ‘haircut’, adding up to 100% and being covered from the borrower’s equity. The higher the LTV ratio then the riskier the loan is for a lender.

More on Loan to Value here

Local Housing Authority (LHA)

The main provider of social housing (or housing authorities) for people who cannot afford to buy their own homes. Local authority housing is allocated according to eligibility and need. Rents are based on the household’s ability to pay.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Net Profit

The actual profit after deducting expenses, such as management fees, letting fees, maintenance costs which are were not included in the calculation of gross profit, have been paid.

Net Yield

Net yield is everything after expenses. It takes into account all fees and expenses associated with owning a property. It is a far more accurate way of calculating actual yield. It is also much harder to calculate as most costs are variable.

Nominee

A person or firm that holds assets, such as shares on behalf of another, enabling the nominee to handle complicated administrative matters.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Open Market Value (OMV)

The realistic price that could be achieved for a property if marketed for sale.

Option

A right granted which gives the receiver an option, but not an obligation, to buy (or sell) shares in a company, or other securities, at an agreed price within a certain time frame.

Ordinary Shares  

Shares which represent normal equity ownership in a company. Ordinary shares generally entitle the owner to vote at shareholder meetings, receive dividends, and receive distributions on the winding up of a company, but do not carry preferential treatment.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Pre-Emption (Also called Anti-Dilution)

A contractual provision which requires the company to offer its shareholders the chance to purchase additional shares to maintain their percentage of equity in advance of further shares being issued.

Portfolio

A group of financial assets such as shares, property or bonds, held by one person or entity.

Portable Appliance Testing (PAT)

The name of a process by which electrical appliances are routinely checked for safety.

Post-Investment

The period of time after an investment has been made in a company.

Preference Shares

A class of shares which have specific preferential rights attached to them, as set out in the company’s articles of association. Typically the preference will be a dividend paid in priority to other shareholders, or priority to distributions on the winding up of the company.

Professional Investor

A classification used by the financial services industry to denote an individual or family.

Property Yield  

A calculation to give an indication of annual returns based on the rental income against how much the property cost: Property Yield (%) = Rental Income/(Property purchase price + Refurbishment Budget).

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Registered Social Landlord (RSL)

Registered providers that own and manage social housing.

Return on Capital Employed (ROCE)

The return on capital employed is, considered by some, a better measurement than return on equity, because ROCE shows how well a company is using both its equity and debt to generate a return.

RICS Surveyor

Building surveyors, like all surveyors, inspect property or land. RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors) is a professional body for chartered surveyors, which includes chartered building surveyors. RICS sets standards and guidance for surveyors and provides training and professional development opportunities for surveyors to comply with changing standards and legislation.

Risk

The potential for losing something of value. With equity investment the main risk to the investor is losing the money invested.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Secondary Market

A market where investors purchase shares from other investors rather than from the company that has issued the shares directly.

Shareholder Agreement

An agreement between a company’s shareholders detailing certain rights and obligations of the shareholders.

Shares

An ownership interest in a company which entitles the shareholder to certain rights, for example a share of profits or dividend payments from the company. Shares are also referred to as “stock”.

Sharia Compliant

Investments that comply with Islamic law and principles, eg. ethical investments with no borrowing where investors share in the profits and losses.

Solicitors Regulatory Authority (SRA)

The regulatory body for solicitors in England and Wales.

Sophisticated Investor

A type of investor who is deemed to have sufficient investing experience and knowledge to weigh the risks and merits of an investment opportunity. This category is for people who have invested in shares in more than one unlisted company (including via The House Crowd) in the last two years or have been a member of a business angel syndicate or network for at least six months including The House Crowd’s Investor group.

Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV)

A Company set up for a particular purpose. In the case of The House Crowd, SPV’s are set up for the purpose of purchasing/owning a property on behalf of the investors.

Subscription Agreement  

An agreement between a company and investors purchasing shares in the company. It sets out the terms of the share purchase and details certain rights and obligations of the company and the investors as shareholders.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Tag-Along Rights

A contractual obligation which gives minority shareholders the right, but not the obligation, to join a transaction where shares are sold by majority shareholders, on the same terms, valuation and conditions of the majority shareholders.

Term Sheet  

A non-binding agreement addressing the basic terms and conditions under which an investment will be made in a business. A term sheet often serves as a template to develop more detailed legal investment documentation.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Unencumbered

An asset or property that is free and clear of any encumbrances such as creditor claims or liens. An unencumbered asset is much easier to sell or transfer than one with an encumbrance. Examples of typical unencumbered assets are a house without any mortgage or other lien on it, a car where the automobile loan has been paid off or stocks purchased in a cash account, rather than a margin account.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Valuation

The monetary worth of a business or property as determined by considering both qualitative and quantitative factors.


We hope you found this useful. If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us. We’re always here to help you with anything you might want to talk about, so do drop us a line!

 

Newton Heath and Marple Development Updates

Newton Heath and Marple Development Updates

Newton Heath Manchester
It has been a few weeks since our last update for the new build development of townhouses in Newton Heath Manchester.
In fact in the last blog it really did look like a building site.
A few months later and the interior designers have worked their magic and the contemporary living spaces are starting to look like homes.

10-10-newton-lounge

 

As you can see from the photographs, the light open kitchen dining areas should prove very popular for those modern families who enjoying entertaining.

10-10-newton-kitchen

The spacious lounge area and bedrooms certainly make these properties stand out from other townhouses in the area.
The bedrooms have been decorated and dressed in soft neutrals to ensure the light airy feel continues throughout.

10-10-newton-bedroom

The team have worked hard to ensure that the finish and specification in the bathrooms have certainly kept our promise of contemporary high specification housing.

10-10-newton-bathroom

Station Road Marple.

Just a few miles away in the leafy village of Marple our project at Station Road is now looking absolutely stunning.

10-10-marple-front
This extensive renovation has ensured that we have kept the character of the property along with the stylish contemporary extension to the rear (photographs to follow of the internal living space).
The property looks incredible and the external landscaping to the rear certainly looks a bit different in these two before and after snaps!

10-10-marple-rear

The photograph above shows the new decked area and extensive living room extension. The removal of the tarmac driveway and old fencing has enabled us to extend the lawn and garden.

marple-garden-1

‘Before’ photograph of the garden requiring a bit of TLC and some turf.

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The Latest Crowdfunding News – 6/10/16

The Latest Crowdfunding News

 

Hi guys and welcome to another crowdfunding news edition, as usual, we will be travelling around the UK and around the globe in order to give you a snapshot of the latest goings-on in the crowdfunding world. Today we start our round-up and focus on The FCA and Cambridge University partnership, both have teamed up to review the current state of alternative finance, to ending our round-up in China. Missed our previous blog round-ups? If so, catch up here.

 

FCA & Cambridge University Team Up to Review UK Alternative Finance

hands

The Financial Conduct Authority (The FCA) and the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance (CCAF) have teamed up to assist in the review of the UK alternative finance industry. The joint project will inform the FCA’s ongoing post-implementation review of crowdfunding regulation which is currently in process.

There’s a consensus that the UK is a global leader when it comes to alternative finance regulation.

Moreover, The Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance is a global leader in research on disruptive finance. The pair will be working on a program of research that will identify any changes in the nature of the industry,clients’ expectations, plus its overall place in the financial services landscape.

The unique partnership will be primarily looking at what the crowdfunding investor population really looks like and how it is evolving, another research area that they will be investigating is how investors on the platforms understand the risks involved, as well as how they use the information provided to them by fundraisers. In addition, their research will look at the types of investments crowdfunding platforms are competing with for investors’ money, plus how these platforms and investors share the burden of due diligence and whether an expectation gap exists between the two.

 

Santander UK Strikes a Partnership With an Alternative Finance Company

Santander

Santander UK has struck a partnership with an alternative finance company to fund social enterprises in a deal that marks the first tie-up between a large British high-street bank and a crowdfunding site. (FT.com,October 2016)

The banking giant is joining forces with Crowdfunder to provide £200,000 to community projects, charities and enterprises that are focused on social change across the country.

The bank will donate half the funding target of a project once it raises 50 per cent from the public online.

This headline has gained attention because the partnership further closes the gap between mainstream and alternative finance, it also paves the way for closer collaboration between a well known high-street lender and the crowdfunding sector.

Back 2014, Santander UK paired up with Funding Circle referred small business customers looking for loans to the P2P lender when the bank was unable to serve them.

However, the deal with Crowdfunder is different because equity crowdfunding involves raising money from the public who each gain a share in the company.

Managing director of Santander Business Banking, Sue Douthwaite, told the FT : “Our purpose is to help people and businesses prosper and we recognise the important role social enterprises and charities play in helping communities to thrive.

“With the power of the crowd, our £200,000 Changemaker Fund will help bring great ideas to life and enable social enterprises and community ventures to grow.”

Image source : FT.com

Africa : Has Crowdfunding Potential but Regulatory Laws need to Catch Up

Africa Crowdfunding

Last year crowdfunding platforms in Africa raised $32.3 million for various projects, data from the Afrikstart Crowdfunding in Africa report reveals. However, that figure could be much higher over the coming years if governments across the continent developed crowdfunding regulations.

As Nigerian journalist Yomi Kazeem mentions in his article for QZ.com, despite its rising popularity, the most common limitation of crowdfunding across most African countries, is a lack of legal and regulatory framework.

The Afrikstart Crowdfunding in Africa report states : “The absence of regulation limits the expansion of equity-based or debt-based crowdfunding platforms in Africa.”

Therefore, having a lack of regulation in place is likely to deter investors from using online platforms as there is no investor protection in place.

However, despite having regulation limitations, with cost of access to internet dropping in parts of Africa and smartphone penetration deepening, on the plus side, more Africans are taking advantage of crowdfunding platforms to finance projects ranging from start-ups to social causes.

South Africa comes out on top when it comes to crowdfunding, The Rainbow Nation’s platforms have raised $30.8 million, it’s worth noting that $32.3 million was raised by crowdfunding platforms from all over Africa, so it just goes to show how well South Africa is championing the concept.

The country’s dominance in crowdfunding on the continent is not accidental. According to a report, the popularity of crowdfunding in South Africa is down to the country’s “sophisticated business market, a robust and reliable regulatory credit system and supervision.”

Although not 100% perfect, other African countries can learn a lot from South Africa and adopt a more robust crowdfunding strategy.

 

Restaurant Chain “M” Secures £1.2M Just Hours After Seedrs Campaign Debut

M Crowdfunding

Just hours after restaurant chain M launched its equity crowdfunding campaign on Seedrs, the London-based company has successfully secured £1.2 million out of its £1.3 million funding goal. (Crowdfund Insider, October 2016)

Since its launch back in 2014, the chain has received numerous awards such as : Best Use of Technology The Cateys 2016, Best Young Chef UK & Ireland 2016, San Pellegrino Awards, Best for Steak and Seafood, and many more.

For those that invested in the campaign, starting with the investors that put £10k into the campaign, they will receive 25% discount at M until January 2019, a copy of Executive Chef Michael Reid’s M: a 24- Hour Cookbook, free membership of M DEN, our luxury private members lounge plus, 15% off online wine purchases.

The investors that put in between £1,000 – £9,999 will receive a 15% discount at M until January 2019, a copy of Executive Chef Michael Reid’s M: a 24- Hour Cookbook and free membership of M DEN,  their luxury private members lounge.

Lastly, those who invested between £200- £999 get 0% discount at M until January 2019 and a copy of Executive Chef Michael Reid’s M: a 24- Hour Cookbook.

You can read more about the crowdfunding campaign here.

Image source : Crowdfund Insider

Crowdfunding The Great Wall of China

great wall of china crowdfunding

Heritage officials have launched a crowdfunding campaign to help pay for restoration work on the Great Wall of China.

China Radio International has reported that more than 16,000 people have donated online since the campaign started at the end of August, raising almost 300,000 yuan ($45,000; £34,000) so far (stats taken from last month).

Dong Yaohui, who’s in charge of the fundraising effort, mentioned on the BBC website : “By pooling the contribution of every single individual, however small it is, we will be able to form a great wall to protect the Great Wall.”

The funds made will go towards restoring the Xifengkou section, which runs through a reservoir, and all of the project spending will be made public.

 

What Are Your Thoughts?

 

Which of our chosen crowdfunding stories has interested you the most? We would love to hear from you, feel free to leave us a comment on our Facebook and Google Plus pages. If you prefer to tweet us, tweet @TheHouseCrowd.

In the meantime if you want to know more about Property Crowdfunding do register for our Information Pack which will tell you all about it.

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Bank Chambers, Stockport, Sales Update

Bank Chambers Stockport.

We have just sold another apartment off-plan (the third of nine) at our Bank Chambers, Stockport development. Work starts on the conversion next week (3rd October 2016) so please keep an eye on these blog pages and our social media for project updates.

The CGI images below show the kitchen, living space and contemporary bathrooms.

thc002-_bank_chambers_kitchen_lo-res       thc002_bankchambersint_bathroom_hr    thc002_bankchambersint_apt7_hr

 

Stockport Market has become the latest place to be with its historic market hall and popular teenage market and is also becoming a foodie hotspot with new eateries popping up along the cobbled streets.

We are looking for a good quality restaurant operator to take the ground floor. It’s in a great location directly opposite the market hall, so if you know of a restaurant owner looking to expand ask them to get in contact.

 

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The Latest Crowdfunding News – 12/9/16

The Latest Crowdfunding News

Hi guys and welcome to our first September crowdfunding news edition. As usual we will be taking a look at the latest goings-on in the world of crowdfunding and today we start our round-up by focusing on Kickstarter who have headed east and launched in Asia to looking at how European alternative finance performed in 2015. Missed our recent round-ups? If so, catch up here.

Kickstarter Launches in Asia

Kickstarter Asia

Kickstarter, one of the most well known crowdfunding sites has launched in both Hong Kong and Singapore respectively, and are their first ever sites in the continent.

Prior to launching in Asia, Kickstarter only operated in Europe, North America, and Australia.

In the past, entrepreneurs from Singapore and Hong Kong had to co-operate with overseas partners if they wanted their ideas published on the site.

With the crowdfunding giant now launching in Hong Kong and Singapore, people can present their projects from a local network as well have their fundraising goals set in Hong Kong/Singapore dollars.

Kickstarter will now compete with local sites such as FringeBacker from Hong Kong as well as the likes of OurCrowd and MoolahSense from Singapore.

Just like other crowdfunding sites, Kickstarter gains a cut from each project that has been pledged by its backers.

Well known Kickstarter projects include the Oculus Rift, which received its first funding via Kickstarter back in 2012 to the Pebble smartwatch.

Image Source : BBC News

Finnish Crowdfunding Act Updated

Finland Crowdfunding

From Asia to now travelling to Scandinavia! A few days ago in Finland, the government updated its crowdfunding act, the new legislation makes it easier to register, for example, until now, equity crowdfunding in the Scandinavian country has required an investment firm license from the Finnish Financial Supervisory Authority (FIN-FSA). However, the license slowed the market entry for new players.

Registration is a considerably more affordable alternative to the investment firm license, and this therefore allows new players into the market.

Investor protection is still at a good level under the new act, despite the fact that the registration process is a lighter form of regulation than a license.

In addition, the new Finnish crowdfunding act does not cover rewards or donations based crowdfunding models. For example, rewards-based models that are used by the likes of Kickstarter fall under consumer protection acts. In contrast, donation based crowdfunding in Finland is legal, anyone who wishes to create a donation based campaign must obtain a special fundraising permit from the police.

To sum it up briefly, Whilst the overall market size of alternative finance in Finland is relatively small, the government and industry bodies are hopeful that a balanced regulatory approach will help boost the up and coming sector.

Native equity crowdfunding company Invesdor’s CEO Lasse Mäkelä recently told Crowdfund Insider that the new Act should increase growth of the Finnish crowdfunding market. He stated :
“On a European level, crowdfunding volume is expected to double this year. We believe that with the new legislation Finland will be able to reach similar numbers.”

Crowdfunding in a tub! A brief insight into Oppo Ice Cream

Oppo Crowdfunding

At The House Crowd we love a good crowdfunding story and thought this was worth a mention (especially if you love ice cream!).
Back in 2015 Oppo Ice Cream at the time, was the most the “most overfunded” offer ever on Seedrs.

The London based company had originally set out to gain £150,000, however, they received triple the specified amount. Earlier this year they was again returned for further funding via Seedrs and smashed their £150,000 in just six hours!

Just like us, they too went on Dragon’s Den, they might not of had much of a slaying as what Frazer experienced, but again just like us being on the show helped propel their product.

Although they came out of the den empty handed, they revealed that they had no intention of taking The Dragon’s money as they had already funded the business by offering shares to their fans which they felt was a much better way of growing their brand. Going on the show for them was about spreading their message to the British public that you can indeed indulge in luxury ice cream… without looking like you have.

As we know, gaining business success is not a walk in the park, and it is something that takes hard work to cultivate. Oppo is also a great example of a small company that leveraged investment crowdfunding to take their business and product to the next level and a tasty investment it turned out to be!

Image source : Crowdfund Insider

FCA Calls for Input on Equity Crowdfunding Regulation

Crowdfunding FCA

Upon releasing the new rules in 2014, the FCA promised a post-implementation review of the crowdfunding market and regulatory framework in 2016 (the “Review”). (Lexology, August 2016)

The financial body has released a ‘Call for input’ which describes the results of their initial market research and sets out a number of questions. The questions are linked to a range of areas and the document contains some hints on the future direction of investment based crowdfunding regulation.

Firstly, one key area that they will be taken into consideration is due diligence. Current regulations do not set a minimum standard of due diligence, the regulations cite concerns relating to financial crime and stresses the importance of protecting the interests of investors. They therefore suggest that minimum standards may be introduced.

Secondly, they’ll take client assessment into consideration. The regulator wants to review the extent to which firms are meeting these requirements and whether clients are sufficiently informed to understand the risks that are involved. In addition, they may consider publishing further advice on how to ensure retail investors meet certain criteria as well as introduce sanctions for companies who do not abide by the rules.

Lastly, the FCA will be looking at disclosure. As Lexology mention in a recent blog article, equity crowdfunding platforms are required to provide potential investors with sufficient information so that they are reasonably able to understand the nature of the product and its risks.The Review will look at whether this high-level rule is sufficient to protect investors.

So what happens now? There are currently no proposals to change the regulatory framework for crowdfunding platforms. However, anyone with an interest in equity (or loan-based) crowdfunding has to submit their response to the FCA before 8 September 2016. The feedback will then be used to inform the FCA’s continuing review of the current market. After the Reviewing process, the financial regulator will consider publishing a new consultation document which will include any proposed rule changes.

 

European Alternative Finance Jumps to €5.4 billion in 2015

Europe Alternative Finance

One news story in particular that we stumbled across this week and everyone in the alternative finance community was talking about was Europe.

A report published by the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance (CCAF) entitled “Sustaining Momentum“, looks at the rapid growth of alternative finance across Europe.

In a nutshell, the CCAF reports on the ongoing growth of alternative finance including peer to peer lending, crowdfunding and more. Their findings show that alternative finance jumped 92% year over year to €5.4 billion in 2015.

In addition their research revealed that the UK continues to dominate the continent at €4.4 billion in aggregate funding. France and Germany are second and third with €319 million and €249 million respectively. The Dutch also performed well with €111 million. If you remove the UK out of the picture, European alternative finance increased by 72% year over year going from €594 million in 2014 to €1.019 billion in 2015. While the overall rate of growth slowed, the industry is gaining momentum as new regulations from across the continent take place as well as an array of platforms start to mature.

Interested in the CCAF’s research? If so, read their research embedded below.

CCAF Europe 2016 Sustaining Momentum – Final by CrowdfundInsider on Scribd

 

What Are Your Thoughts?

 

Which of our chosen crowdfunding stories has interested you the most? We would love to hear from you, feel free to leave us a comment on our Facebook and Google Plus pages. If you prefer to tweet us, tweet @TheHouseCrowd.

In the meantime if you want to know more about Property Crowdfunding do register for our Information Pack which will tell you all about it. 

Register Now For More Information