Capital Growth v Cash Flow

Capital Growth v Cash Flow

This is an excerpt from Chapter 5, ‘Capital Growth versus Cash Flow’ of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

Capital growth is a very powerful concept. As Albert Einstein once said, compound capital growth is the eighth wonder of the world.

What compound growth means is that if an asset worth £100,000 increases in value by 10% a year it will only take eight years for that asset to be worth more than double its original value. In ten years it will be worth around £259,000. And that’s without leverage.

Imagine that you’re back in 1996. You have £16,000 to invest, but you’re not sure what to do with it. Your stockbroker tells you one thing, your financial adviser tells you another, and your bank manager – of course – reckons you should stick it in the bank for a rainy day.

Instead, you decide to use that £16,000 as a deposit on an £80,000 buy-to-let property in London (that was the average house price in London just 20 years ago).

Two decades on, the average London property is worth over £488,000.

That means, provided you covered your mortgage payments and costs with rental income, your £16,000 has turned into £408,000 profit. Now there may well have been various incidental costs to take into account but, I think it’s fair to say, you would still have done many times better than if you had put that money into a pension or kept it in the bank.

It’s not possible to make the benefits of property investment any clearer than that.

It is, in my opinion, far and away the best investment you can make. Imagine that property only did half as well as this over the next ten years. It would still be likely to produce several times the returns of any other asset class.

Because of the power of compound growth, many people think property is all about capital growth, and that aspect is certainly what helps make it an attractive investment. And the fact that you can leverage purchases and obtain, for example, an 80% LTV mortgage multiplies the rate at which your capital can grow at astonishing rates.

Nonetheless, many people have come unstuck by leveraging highly and speculating on capital growth. They have then found themselves in an unsustainable position having to subsidise mortgage payments as the rental income has not been sufficient to cover their financial outgoings on the property.

You may be able to support one property at £200 a month whilst you wait for it to increase in value, but how many more of those could you afford?

However, if all your properties at least ‘wash their face’ and produce a small profit from rental income, you can support as many of them as you can buy – and benefit from the capital growth in all of them.


To read more about why to invest in property, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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5 Ways To Maximise Your Rental Yield

Yes, generation rent is on the rise, and the housing shortage is pushing more people into the rental market. But that’s not to say that buy-to-let landlords should be resting on their laurels. If you want to get the most from your investment, you will want to maximise the rental yield on your buy-to-let property.

If you’re in the process of choosing a buy-to-let property investment, these are some of the things you should consider when making your decision:

Picking Your Area For Best Rental Yield

As Kirsty and Phil have been telling us for years, it’s all about location, location, location. Along with picking an up-and-coming area to invest in, where you will get a return and ongoing rental yield as popularity grows, there are some other aspects to consider.

Firstly, pick an area with good transport connections. The majority of people who rent have jobs in nearby towns and cities, and a good commuter route is therefore high on a prospective tenant’s list of priorities.

Areas in catchment for good schools are another winner; both at primary and secondary level. We would recommend checking out the primary schools, in particular, because it is more likely that parents of younger children will still be renting, before looking to buy as their child gets older. Some may even rent specifically to get a child into the local school before considering purchasing in their preferred location.

The Waitrose effect is something well-known in property investment circles. Basically, wherever a Waitrose supermarket is in development, prices are about to rise. This particular store is an indication of affluent nearby residents. Good bars and restaurants, coffee shops, and other higher end high street and designer stores springing up, are also indicators of an influx of affluence to an area. On the flipside, however, it may mean that prices have already risen… so it’s a question of getting in quickly.

Promising Locations for Property Investment

It’s important to note that a ‘promising’ area does not necessarily mean the cheapest, nor the most expensive. A promising location is one that people want to live in.

Rather than investing in a place that’s close to where you live, as many usual landlords might do, with property crowdfunding, you are free to invest wherever in the country offers the most promising rental yield opportunities. Investing in this way means that you don’t have to go out to check things in the property, chase rent, or fix things when they go wrong.

View our Property Investments

Never Neglect Numbers If You Want A Good Rental Yield

You must always, always do your research. Find out the cost of properties in the area, find out the average rental yield for different types of property in different areas.

You should also be sensible about where you’re putting your money: can you afford to live if the investment goes toes-up? Don’t ruin yourself, and be aware of risk.

Build a diverse portfolio, and don’t put all your eggs in one basket. If one investment goes wrong, when you have a diversified portfolio, you have other investments to fall back on.

Who’s Your Target Tenant?

Do you know what sort of tenant you’re looking for? If you haven’t thought about this, stop right now.

You need to do a little research and check that the property you’re considering investing in is the sort of property that tenants will want to live in. It’s no good, for example, going after the HMO market in an area where the leading demographic is in the 55+ age range. Matching prospective tenants to the area, and making sure that the home you’re offering meets their needs, is crucial.

Don’t just choose a property you’d like to live in yourself. Put yourself in the shoes of your target tenant. What are they looking for? Students aren’t after all the luxuries that young professionals are – they’re more focused on location, if anything. Likewise, families are likely to prefer properties with outdoor space.

Families are also less likely to be swayed by luxury, as much as the notion of having a blank canvas on which to create their dream home. With white walls and no furniture, it’s theirs to do as they wish, within reason. Giving your tenants this freedom ensures they’re more likely to stay for the long term, which is good news for landlords.

Remember, too, that lots of tenants have pets, particularly cats and dogs, and all too often, landlords limit their prospective tenants by not allowing pets in the property. Not that that’s a concern when you’re a crowdfunding investor, but still – something to bear in mind.

Well-Appointed Properties Go Faster

Making things easier for your tenants, with all the mod-cons they’ll need, will help your property get snapped up sooner.

Microwaves, ovens, washing machines, and dishwashers, all make a property more appealing to tenants. Knowing they don’t have to buy these items themselves, and that their maintenance is covered by their landlord, is always a plus when searching for a place to rent. If you can go even further, offering things like wifi and wine fridges, all the better, particularly when dealing with young professionals as tenants!


Hopefully, this will have given you some ideas to consider as you narrow down the properties you wish to add to your buy-to-let investment portfolio. Do you have any other ideas to help prospective investors choose wisely? Why not drop us a tweet with your idea!

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Glossary of Property Investment Terms

There are a lot of terms unique to the investment world that will be new to those just embarking on building a property portfolio. That’s why we thought it would be very useful for you to have a thorough Glossary of Property Investment Terms to help you to thoroughly understand some of the finer points of investing. We hope you find it useful!

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

A Shares 

A class of shares which have specific rights attached to them, as set out in a company’s articles of association.

Angel Investors

Investors who provide investment and other support to early-stage businesses. Traditionally angels are wealthy individuals who have a significant amount of entrepreneurial, industry or investment experience.

Angel Network (or Angel Syndicate)

A group of angel investors that pool together money and other resources to invest in, and provide support to, early-stage businesses.

Annualised Return

Average return each year over the minimum term, based on the total of rental income and estimated capital growth.

Find out more about Annualised Returns here.

Articles of Association

A company document that sets out its management and administrative structure.

The articles dictate the internal affairs of the company such as director and shareholder rights, the issue and transfer of shares, and the organisation of meetings.

Asset Class

A class of economic property that has similar characteristics. Listed shares, government bonds and real estate are all asset classes.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

B Shares

A class of shares which have specific rights attached to them, as set out in the company’s articles of association.

Below Market Value (BMV)

Properties are sometimes sold at below the market value, meaning they are offered at lower prices than comparable properties.

Beneficial Shareholder / Owner

An investor who owns the economic value and other shareholder benefits attached to shares, such as dividends and tax reliefs, but the registered title to their shares is held with another person or entity often for administrative convenience.

Bridging Finance

Bridging loans are a short-term funding option. They are used to ‘bridge’ a gap between a debt coming due – primarily for property transactions – and the main line of credit becoming available. Alternatively, they can act as a short-term loan in pressing circumstances.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Capital Employed  

The sum of shareholders’ equity and debt liabilities; can be simplified as Total Assets – Current Liabilities.

Capital Growth

The increase in value of an asset or investment over time, measured on the basis of the current value of the asset or investment, in relation to the amount originally invested in it.

Convertible Equity

An equity investment where money is invested in a company in exchange for shares to be issued at a later date. The share issue is generally triggered by the company raising finance from other investors. In return for investing early, the convertible equity investors receive a discount on the price of the shares issued to the other investors.

Convertible Note

A debt investment where money is invested in a company with the expectation that the debt will “convert” into shares issued at a later date. The share issue is generally triggered by the company raising finance from other investors. Before the conversion, the investor is paid interest.

Crowdfunding

The funding of projects or ventures by raising money from a large number of people, usually online. The three main types of crowdfunding are equity, debt and rewards/donations.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Damp Proof Course (DPC)

A barrier through the structure by capillary action such as through a phenomenon known as rising damp.

Debt

Money owed by one person/company to another. The borrower has to repay the money at a later date and generally also has to pay interest.

Dilution

A reduction in the ownership percentage of a share in a company caused by the issue of new shares.

Diversification

An investment strategy that involves mixing the amount, values and kinds of investments within a portfolio to spread risk and minimise losses.

Dividend

A dividend is a distribution of a portion of a company’s earnings, decided by the board of directors, to a class of its shareholders. Dividends can be issued as cash payments, as shares of stock, or other property.

Dividend Distribution

The distribution of a portion of a company’s profits to investors.

Drag-Along Right

A contractual obligation that allows majority shareholders to force minority shareholders to join in the sale of a company on the same terms, valuation and conditions of the majority shareholders.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS)

A UK tax scheme offering income tax and capital gains tax reliefs to qualifying private investors who invest in eligible businesses.

Equity

Shares or other securities that represent an ownership interest in a company.

Equity Crowdfunding

A type of crowdfunding that enables multiple investors to a buy shares, or other equity interests, in a company, usually through an online process.

Exit

An event when investors may be able to cash in and sell their shares, such as an initial public offering (IPO) or trade sale.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

FENSA Certificate

Documentary evidence that the installation work has been self-certified to comply with the Building Regulations

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA)

The financial services regulatory body in the UK, formerly called the Financial Services Authority (FSA).

Fully Diluted

All the shares of a company in issue, plus all shares which are the subject of options or other contractual rights to be issued in the future (regardless of whether the right has vested).

Fund  

An investment opportunity that seeks to raise money to be invested across multiple businesses. Fund campaigns are commonly used to invest in businesses participating in accelerator programmes and competition winners.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Gas Safety Certificate

By law, landlords must have all gas appliances serviced regularly, normally once a year, by a Gas Safe registered engineer.

Gross Development Value (GDV)

The estimated value that a property, or new development, would fetch on the open market if it were to be sold in the current economic climate.

Gross Rate of Return

The total rate of return on an investment before deduction of any fees or expenses. The gross rate of return is quoted over a specific period of time, such as a month, quarter or year. It is often quoted as the rate of return on an investment in marketing materials.

Growth-Stage

The stage that a business is at when it has passed its ‘seed’ or initial stage and has established proof of concept and looking to grow.

Gross Yield

The yield on an investment before the deduction of taxes and expenses (such as management fees and maintenance costs). Gross yield is expressed in percentage terms. It is calculated as the annual return on an investment prior to taxes and expenses divided by the current price of the investment.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

High Net Worth Investor (HNWI)

A classification used by the financial services industry to denote an individual, or a family, with high net worth. If you earn more than £100,000 a year or have net assets of more than £250,000, you may qualify as a High Net Worth Investor.

HMO (House in Multiple Occupation)

A house occupied by more than two qualifying persons, being persons who are not all members of the same family. A “qualifying person” is a person whose only or principal place of residence is the HMO.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Initial Public Offering (IPO)

The first time that a company’s shares are available for public purchase by means of a listing on a stock exchange. This process is also known as ’going public’ or ‘floating’.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Know Your Client (KYC)

The regulatory process that financial services firms and certain other businesses must perform to verify the identity of their customers to help prevent against money laundering and other financial crimes.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Loan to Value (LTV)

A term commonly used by banks and building societies to represent the ratio of the first mortgage lien as a percentage of the total appraised value of real property. For instance, if someone borrows £130,000 to purchase a house worth £150,000, the LTV ratio is £130,000 to £150,000 or £130,000/£150,000, or 87%. The remaining 13% represent the lender’s ‘haircut’, adding up to 100% and being covered from the borrower’s equity. The higher the LTV ratio then the riskier the loan is for a lender.

More on Loan to Value here

Local Housing Authority (LHA)

The main provider of social housing (or housing authorities) for people who cannot afford to buy their own homes. Local authority housing is allocated according to eligibility and need. Rents are based on the household’s ability to pay.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Net Profit

The actual profit after deducting expenses, such as management fees, letting fees, maintenance costs which are were not included in the calculation of gross profit, have been paid.

Net Yield

Net yield is everything after expenses. It takes into account all fees and expenses associated with owning a property. It is a far more accurate way of calculating actual yield. It is also much harder to calculate as most costs are variable.

Nominee

A person or firm that holds assets, such as shares on behalf of another, enabling the nominee to handle complicated administrative matters.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Open Market Value (OMV)

The realistic price that could be achieved for a property if marketed for sale.

Option

A right granted which gives the receiver an option, but not an obligation, to buy (or sell) shares in a company, or other securities, at an agreed price within a certain time frame.

Ordinary Shares  

Shares which represent normal equity ownership in a company. Ordinary shares generally entitle the owner to vote at shareholder meetings, receive dividends, and receive distributions on the winding up of a company, but do not carry preferential treatment.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Pre-Emption (Also called Anti-Dilution)

A contractual provision which requires the company to offer its shareholders the chance to purchase additional shares to maintain their percentage of equity in advance of further shares being issued.

Portfolio

A group of financial assets such as shares, property or bonds, held by one person or entity.

Portable Appliance Testing (PAT)

The name of a process by which electrical appliances are routinely checked for safety.

Post-Investment

The period of time after an investment has been made in a company.

Preference Shares

A class of shares which have specific preferential rights attached to them, as set out in the company’s articles of association. Typically the preference will be a dividend paid in priority to other shareholders, or priority to distributions on the winding up of the company.

Professional Investor

A classification used by the financial services industry to denote an individual or family.

Property Yield  

A calculation to give an indication of annual returns based on the rental income against how much the property cost: Property Yield (%) = Rental Income/(Property purchase price + Refurbishment Budget).

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Registered Social Landlord (RSL)

Registered providers that own and manage social housing.

Return on Capital Employed (ROCE)

The return on capital employed is, considered by some, a better measurement than return on equity, because ROCE shows how well a company is using both its equity and debt to generate a return.

RICS Surveyor

Building surveyors, like all surveyors, inspect property or land. RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors) is a professional body for chartered surveyors, which includes chartered building surveyors. RICS sets standards and guidance for surveyors and provides training and professional development opportunities for surveyors to comply with changing standards and legislation.

Risk

The potential for losing something of value. With equity investment the main risk to the investor is losing the money invested.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Secondary Market

A market where investors purchase shares from other investors rather than from the company that has issued the shares directly.

Shareholder Agreement

An agreement between a company’s shareholders detailing certain rights and obligations of the shareholders.

Shares

An ownership interest in a company which entitles the shareholder to certain rights, for example a share of profits or dividend payments from the company. Shares are also referred to as “stock”.

Sharia Compliant

Investments that comply with Islamic law and principles, eg. ethical investments with no borrowing where investors share in the profits and losses.

Solicitors Regulatory Authority (SRA)

The regulatory body for solicitors in England and Wales.

Sophisticated Investor

A type of investor who is deemed to have sufficient investing experience and knowledge to weigh the risks and merits of an investment opportunity. This category is for people who have invested in shares in more than one unlisted company (including via The House Crowd) in the last two years or have been a member of a business angel syndicate or network for at least six months including The House Crowd’s Investor group.

Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV)

A Company set up for a particular purpose. In the case of The House Crowd, SPV’s are set up for the purpose of purchasing/owning a property on behalf of the investors.

Subscription Agreement  

An agreement between a company and investors purchasing shares in the company. It sets out the terms of the share purchase and details certain rights and obligations of the company and the investors as shareholders.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Tag-Along Rights

A contractual obligation which gives minority shareholders the right, but not the obligation, to join a transaction where shares are sold by majority shareholders, on the same terms, valuation and conditions of the majority shareholders.

Term Sheet  

A non-binding agreement addressing the basic terms and conditions under which an investment will be made in a business. A term sheet often serves as a template to develop more detailed legal investment documentation.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Unencumbered

An asset or property that is free and clear of any encumbrances such as creditor claims or liens. An unencumbered asset is much easier to sell or transfer than one with an encumbrance. Examples of typical unencumbered assets are a house without any mortgage or other lien on it, a car where the automobile loan has been paid off or stocks purchased in a cash account, rather than a margin account.

Glossary of Property Investment Terms | The House Crowd

Valuation

The monetary worth of a business or property as determined by considering both qualitative and quantitative factors.


We hope you found this useful. If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us. We’re always here to help you with anything you might want to talk about, so do drop us a line!