Frazer’s Book Is The Number 1 Bestseller!

As you’re probably aware by now, Frazer has written another book called ‘The Alternative Guide To Property Investment’ which is all about how you can use crowdfunding to build your property portfolio and a better financial future for you and your family.

The book was available for pre-order yesterday, and he already managed to top the charts for real estate, personal finance and investing, making it a bestseller!

You can order the book off Amazon here

Here are some of the reviews so far…

“Frazer has written this book using common English words which are spoken by most people every day, which makes this book a joy to read. It is almost like a modern courtroom drama with the various points discussed, analysed, the evidence being carefully considered as the reader is guided through this book with short chapters, and a complete lack of waffle or flannel (if you prefer). I wished that Frazer had written this book 5 years earlier!”

John Miller (crowdfunding investor)

“An invaluable and enlightening insight for your financial future’’

Nigel Beverley (crowdfunding investor)

“This book shows how I can secure my family’s future through property investment, whilst avoiding the usual hurdles. It gives me peace of mind that crowdfunding platforms exist and, more importantly, that they are run by real property experts.”

Gareth Clements (crowdfunding investor)

“I‘m retired and always looking for the best way to boost my income each year. This guide is essential reading for anyone who wants to control their own investment decisions. Why didn’t someone tell me about this brilliant alternative form of investment before now.”

Paul Stallard (crowdfunding investor)

“Frazer’s book about property crowdfunding gives a fascinating outline of his history over a wide range of ‘job’ experiences which led to the creation of his crowd-sharing property business (I think its success must stem from him earning money from ‘magic’ shows in his early teens, coupled with the rigorous training of a law degree.)

As for the main part of the book, I read it with much interest (non-monetary!) – it was very thorough – and when I had finished it, I felt that I had no questions left to ask about property crowdfunding! It also reinforced my opinion that ‘I had done the right thing’ in putting some of my pennies into such a scheme!”

Dr. Philip Briggs (crowdfunding investor)

Residential v Commercial Property Investment

Residential v Commercial Property Investment

This is an excerpt from Chapter 6, ‘Residential versus Commercial Property Investment’, of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

We have discussed the residential property investment sector at some length, but commercial property can be an excellent addition to a healthy investment portfolio if you are looking for consistent, steady yields alongside a decent level of growth.

Commercial real estate has shown long-term positive performance, with combined annual returns averaging around 9% depending on the area and type of property.

The steady and predictable cash stream potentially afforded by rental income from commercial property translates to possible protection against volatility in financial markets.

Here are some reasons why investors may find commercial property attractive:

  • Historically strong returns – With an average annual return of about 9% over a 20-year period commercial real estate has performed well historically.
  • Rental income from stable commercial properties means a potential steady and predictable cash stream (translating into possible protection and diversification during financial market volatility).
  • Beneficial taxation – When structured properly, commercial property can offer investors a number of tax benefits.
  • A hedge against inflation – A potentially important factor for your portfolio, since property normally benefits from inflation.
  • Ability to leverage your capital – As with residential property you can obtain mortgages and potentially multiply your ROCE (return on capital employed).
  • Diversification – There is no direct correlation with the stock market and you can further diversify within the asset class itself.

These are some of the different types of commercial property into which you can invest and spread your risk:

  • Office property (either prime or secondary);
  • Industrial property: Warehouse and manufacturing units; heavy manufacturing; light assembly; ‘flex’ warehouses (mixed industrial/office space); and bulk warehouses, like distribution centres.;
  • Retail: Individual shops,takeaways, shopping centres, etc.;
  • Multi-unit apartment buildings/HMOs: Although providing homes, these are treated as commercial premises;
  • Self-storage: Self-contained units rented to tenants for storage of material items, usually on a monthly basis;
  • Hotels: Bed and breakfast, small boutique hotels or big-name establishments.

However, property investors when they start investing seem to prefer residential, perhaps understandably, as it falls more easily within their knowledge base and comfort zone.

The philosophical difference between residential and commercial is that when you invest in residential property, you are essentially transacting with individuals – it is a much more personal transaction especially as people will be living in your property and making it their home.


To read more about why to invest in property, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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Capital Growth v Cash Flow

Capital Growth v Cash Flow

This is an excerpt from Chapter 5, ‘Capital Growth versus Cash Flow’ of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

Capital growth is a very powerful concept. As Albert Einstein once said, compound capital growth is the eighth wonder of the world.

What compound growth means is that if an asset worth £100,000 increases in value by 10% a year it will only take eight years for that asset to be worth more than double its original value. In ten years it will be worth around £259,000. And that’s without leverage.

Imagine that you’re back in 1996. You have £16,000 to invest, but you’re not sure what to do with it. Your stockbroker tells you one thing, your financial adviser tells you another, and your bank manager – of course – reckons you should stick it in the bank for a rainy day.

Instead, you decide to use that £16,000 as a deposit on an £80,000 buy-to-let property in London (that was the average house price in London just 20 years ago).

Two decades on, the average London property is worth over £488,000.

That means, provided you covered your mortgage payments and costs with rental income, your £16,000 has turned into £408,000 profit. Now there may well have been various incidental costs to take into account but, I think it’s fair to say, you would still have done many times better than if you had put that money into a pension or kept it in the bank.

It’s not possible to make the benefits of property investment any clearer than that.

It is, in my opinion, far and away the best investment you can make. Imagine that property only did half as well as this over the next ten years. It would still be likely to produce several times the returns of any other asset class.

Because of the power of compound growth, many people think property is all about capital growth, and that aspect is certainly what helps make it an attractive investment. And the fact that you can leverage purchases and obtain, for example, an 80% LTV mortgage multiplies the rate at which your capital can grow at astonishing rates.

Nonetheless, many people have come unstuck by leveraging highly and speculating on capital growth. They have then found themselves in an unsustainable position having to subsidise mortgage payments as the rental income has not been sufficient to cover their financial outgoings on the property.

You may be able to support one property at £200 a month whilst you wait for it to increase in value, but how many more of those could you afford?

However, if all your properties at least ‘wash their face’ and produce a small profit from rental income, you can support as many of them as you can buy – and benefit from the capital growth in all of them.


To read more about why to invest in property, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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Establishing Your Own Investment Criteria

Establishing Your Own Investment Criteria

This is an excerpt from Chapter 4, ‘Establishing Your Own Investment Criteria’, of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

We held a dinner for our top-20 investors recently and I think it’s fair to say that just about everybody had different reasons for investing and slightly different criteria for choosing what to invest in.

Before investing any money, you need to consider what you want to achieve. Do you want to sit back and let your investment grow in value (e.g. stamps or wine or a pension fund, if you still think that’s a good idea) or do you want to generate an income (e.g. shares or property)?

Or perhaps a mix of the two?

Do you solely want to provide for your retirement and reinvest any income generated or do you need to earn an immediate income from your investments?

Are you prepared to risk all your capital on the same sort of investment or do you want to make some ultra-safe investments and speculate with a certain portion of your money on riskier but potentially more lucrative investments?

These are just a few of the questions you should ask yourself as the answers will help formulate your own investment criteria. If you have decided that you want to invest some of your capital into property, then the two most significant decisions you need to make are whether you want the emphasis to be on capital growth or cash flow and whether you want to make commercial or residential property investments.


To read more about establishing your own investment criteria, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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Why Property Is the Best Vehicle to Supplement Your Pension

Why Property Is the Best Vehicle to Supplement Your Pension

This is an excerpt from Chapter 3, ‘Why Property Is the Best Vehicle to Supplement Your Pension’ of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

Research from Saga Investment Services (amongst various others that reached the same conclusions) has found that the UK’s over-50s population needs to double the number of pension contributions they are making, if they are to stand any chance of a decent income through their retirement.

The research found that the majority of those over-50s surveyed believed they’d need an average annual income of £15,200 to get them through their retirement (personally I cannot imagine trying to subsist on such an amount in my old age – especially given inflationary factors).

The people surveyed estimated that they could generate this from a pension pot of £143,830 on average. Their estimated figures fall shockingly short of reality.

A pension pot of this size would actually generate just £7,940 guaranteed income a year (for a healthy 65-year-old) for life. That’s nearly a 50% shortfall. Basically, they need double the size of their pension just to make ends meet.

To have a comfortable life, which respondents identified as being defined by holidays, dining out, socialising, and hobbies, it was calculated that they’d need at least £21,630 (clearly they are less profligate than me). That would require a pension pot of nearly £400,000 – double the respondents’ estimate of £194,000 (which would generate just £10,170 guaranteed income a year).

On their estimated required sum, their pension fund would be exhausted within 12 years.

Poor returns, excessive fees and inconsistent annuity rates: a pension sure ain’t what it used to be. It’s no surprise, then, that people are starting to look for alternative ways of generating money for their retirement. Research suggests that property investment is turning out to be twice as popular as any other form of investment with the over-50s.

The younger generation, too, is turning down traditional pension plans, focusing instead on property investments (and now crowdfunding as a means to access the asset class). As mentioned previously, the number of people choosing – or being forced – to rent, due to the difficulty of getting into the property market, or simply because it’s more convenient in many ways, is rising rapidly.

A pension also has the disadvantages of limited (and badly publicised) choice of annuity provider and the fact the money is inaccessible.

When it comes to cashing in, holders are often disappointed to find that they are unable to access their lump sum when they wish to without severe financial penalties. And despite recent changes, one can only access 25% of one’s pension pot without incurring punitive taxation.

Not only that, as far as I know, the benefits of a pension end when the holder dies. That means you could have saved £400,000 in your pension, purchased an annuity with that, at age 65, and receive £21,000 a year thereafter. But if you were to pass away within a few years your spouse and heirs would receive nothing. The pension company keeps everything.

Clearly, this is not the case if you buy a property, which can be inherited; though the Treasury will, no doubt, steal as much of it as they can. Did I say ‘steal’ – how outrageous, that I should accuse our esteemed government of ‘stealing’ money that has already had tax paid on it at least once before – in the form of income tax, stamp duty, tax on savings interest, dividend tax, etc.

I do apologise. Clearly, it’s perfectly fair for them to take whatever they feel like.

Whilst it is important to start saving for retirement as early in life as possible, the younger generations are waiting later and later before considering their retirement planning. This may be in part due to high living costs and stagnating real earnings amongst the young … or, perhaps, their preference for electronic gadgets, dining out, designer clothes and foreign holidays over prudent saving … Just saying!


To read more about supplementing your pension with property, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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How Much Diversification Is Sensible?

How Much Diversification Is Sensible?

This is an excerpt from Chapter Two, ‘How Much Diversification Is Sensible?’ of Frazer’s upcoming book, ‘The Alternative Guide To Property Investment‘. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

In the previous chapter, I mentioned that I go against traditional wisdom as I am not particularly convinced about diversification across different asset classes as one cannot possibly be knowledgeable about all of them and therefore must seek to rely on third-party advisers. If you have no time or inclination to look after your own money this is probably sage advice.

I accept that for most people there are good reasons to do so but, for me, I would point to the fact that one of the wealthiest people I have ever met invests all his money in property. But not just in any property, and not just in one particular area, but in one particular street (in central London). He won’t even consider buying properties on adjoining streets. As far as he is concerned, they are outside his area of expertise. Clearly, specialisation can have its advantages.

Therefore, I am not giving advice, just telling you what I personally think. The consensus of opinion about diversification may be generally sensible for most people but may not be right for everyone, especially for those who are experts in their field. That’s a matter for you to decide.

What I do think is sensible for most people is to diversify and spread your risk (within reason) so all your eggs are not in one basket.

And one reason I believe property crowdfunding is such a beneficial concept is that it allows you to spread whatever available capital you have over a number of different properties so, if a disaster befalls one, you don’t have all your money tied up in it and you still have others to fall back on.

Within the asset class ‘property’ itself, you could, if you wish, diversify your portfolio in a number of different ways. It could include traditional buy-to-let properties, new-build apartments, commercial investments, HMOs (houses in multiple occupation) and ‘fixer-uppers’.

Secured lending and development finance are other options that fall within the property investment umbrella, as you lend out sums to property developers and business owners who own property they can use as security.

Diversification also means a selection of risk profiles. Of course, you should take into account your personal circumstances and lifestyle requirements, as well as your own attitude to risk. Typically, higher risk investments come with the prospect of higher rewards, whilst a safer investment may yield lesser gains.

Buy-to-let has been the most popular option for property investment. Private renting has almost doubled in the period from 2003 to 2015, and in Manchester, it has almost quadrupled, from 6% to 20%.

This means, in theory, that the buy-to-let sector should offer great potential for investment over the coming years. However, as we shall learn later, the traditional way of purchasing single buy-to-let properties may no longer be the best way to capitalise upon this growing market. In fact, it may not be feasible at all for most individuals anymore.

The commercial property market, too, can be a good option.

Investing in commercial real estate can mean:

  • positive leverage (potentially increasing ROI (return on investment);
  • tax benefits (proper structuring can offer an array of benefits tied to interest, depreciation and so on);
  • more control (personal ownership equals control);
  • a hedge against inflation (such property tends to benefit long term from inflation);
  • cash flow and current income (rental income from stable commercial real estate means a potentially steady and predictable income stream);
  • historically strong returns (average annual return: 9.5% sustained over a 20-year period).

You can find out more about commercial property and how it compares with residential property investment later in this book.


To read more about diversification, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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Why Invest in Property At All?

Why Invest in Property At All?

This is an excerpt from Chapter One, ‘Why Invest In Property At All?’ of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

Fact: almost everybody wants to be able to retire at some point and enjoy the later years of their lives in comfort.

If you think the state pension will allow you to do that, then, sorry, you are living in La La Land. The government will not look after you in your later years. It simply can’t afford to.

The maximum state pension in 2016/17 is £119.30 per week. Can you live comfortably on that? In fact, can you live on that at all?

It is imperative that you do something to supplement that. Your main choices are:

  • savings accounts
  • a private pension
  • shares
  • property

I will dealing with each of these briefly.

Savings Accounts

We are always being told that keeping your money in a bank account is safe and it’s guaranteed – at least up to £75,000. That is provided the government doesn’t also go bankrupt, which is not as ridiculous as it might sound; it would have happened here in the 1970s had the IMF not stepped in, and just take a look at Greece and Italy and Portugal and Spain … oh yes, and France, to see how vulnerable many governments are right now. I do not believe saving your money in a bank account is in any way a sensible manner to provide for your retirement.

The only thing that is guaranteed is that the value of that money is being eroded year on year by inflation, and given the current rates of interest payable the net value is actually decreasing. Even if you had a million pounds saved by the time you retired at, say, 2% interest, that would only provide you with £20,000 a year income – and that’s before tax.

Pensions

So, let’s look at private pensions…

The days of the final salary pension are long gone, and few, if any, private pensions have delivered what clients expected while some, it’s fair to say, have been outright disasters. The returns, whilst clearly considerably better than a savings account, are still negligible and the only people, in my opinion, who seem to really profit are the institutions that provide them.

We’ve seen pension fund after pension fund collapse, leaving thousands with substantial losses, executives ripping off their firms and employees for millions, and major holes appearing in the entire ‘safety-net’ structure. Robert Maxwell and the Mirror Group and British Home Stores are just two of a number of pension funds that spring to mind.

Please read Chapter 3 if you need convincing that the pension most people have is nowhere near enough to generate an annuity that will finance a comfortable retirement.

So whilst you definitely do need a vehicle to provide for your retirement, it definitely does not need to be an institutional or company pension.

Investing in Shares

Clearly, fortunes can be made in the stock market – if you know what you are doing. If you don’t, then picking the best tracker fund you can find would seem the most sensible option. I would not advocate against investing in the stock market but in my opinion, it is considerably more volatile than property and there are many more factors beyond your control that make it harder to invest in successfully.

Property

Of all the investment options available, I believe property is the one people most easily understand and, therefore, are most likely to be successful with.

I mean, let’s face it, even Goldman Sachs didn’t really understand what they were peddling in the noughties. The more complicated something is, the more likely it is that investors don’t really know what they are doing or what the risks are. They don’t even know what it is they don’t know, so how can they possibly evaluate the risks?


To read more about why to invest in property, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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Baby Doomers: A Bleak Retirement Outlook For The Over 55s

Baby Doomers: A Bleak Retirement Outlook For The Over 55s

The House Crowd has conducted a survey of the over 55 age group to ascertain their plans for retirement. The results make for decidedly depressing reading.

Baby Doomers

Those nearing the end of their working years reported a pessimistic outlook for their retirement. 78% of those surveyed said that they are financially unprepared for their retirement, with over a quarter saying that they think it’s too late to change plans and save more.

Just 16% of respondents were confident that their lifestyle will improve once they retire, whilst 37% expected their lives to be worse. The financially secure retirement that we all hope for was considered no longer possible for a full 41%.

State Pension Shocker

Shockingly, it seems that a significant proportion of over 55s will be reliant on their state pension to support them through their later years.

Over half of respondents do not have a personal pension and have no plans to put one in place. Over a quarter have no workplace pension, and – once again – no plans to put one in place.

Once retired, respondents said they’d like £18,235 to live off, but expected just £14,180.

And who’s to blame? 20%, on average, blame the government.

Well, 23% of women do, anyway. Only 18% of men thought the government was at fault for their retirement woes.

Perhaps this has something to do with the fact that fewer women reported being financially prepared for retirement than men. Just 17% of women thought they were on track, compared with 28% of men. Regardless of gender, the results are far lower than anybody would hope.

A Silver Lining

It all looks pretty dismal, but there could be a solution. Frazer had this to say after seeing the survey results:

“These results paint a miserable picture for our Baby Doomers – but it’s not too late for people approaching retirement to improve their situation. By exploring newer investment options, like property crowdfunding, over 55s can benefit from solid rates of return to help make retirement more comfortable.”

The property crowdfunding industry has been around since 2012, and is now worth billions worldwide. Though, as with any investment, there are risks to capital, the potential returns of this method of property investment could mean the difference between a rotten or a relaxing retirement.

Find out more about property crowdfunding as a potential investment choice for your retirement by registering on our site using the purple button below. Alternatively, click the blue button to see our current range of property investment options:

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Apache Capital Partners Fund 466 Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester

Apache Capital Partners Fund 466 Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester

Property investment management firm, Apache Capital Partners, has teamed with Moda Living to secure senior debt financing of £85m, secured on the Angel Gardens development in Manchester city centre. The development will create 466 private rental sector homes in Manchester.

Deutsche Pfandbriefbank has agreed to a four-year term funding contract for the construction period of the development, which will convert to an investment loan for the rest of the term. The development is set to cost a total of £153m. Completion of the project is set for 2020.

The premium private rental sector apartments will stand 34 storeys tall, making it one of the tallest residential towers built outside London since the 2008 crash. Covering 520,000 sq ft, the Angel Gardens development forms part of the NOMA redevelopment project, regenerating a 20-acre site opposite Manchester’s Victoria station.

Angel Gardens and Beyond…

Angel Gardens, however, is not the only private rental sector delivered by the joint venture between Apache and Moda Living. It will be the first of many private rental sector developments created by the venture. In the pipeline is a total of 5,000 new private rental sector homes across eight cities across the UK, including London and the south east.

Johnny Caddick, managing director at Moda Living, believes the project will “set new expectations for rental housing in Manchester and throughout the UK”.

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Private Rental Sector Homes in Manchester: On Trend

Investing in property in Manchester is becoming a real trend for high profile investors. And the private rental sector is hot property, considering the vast increase in those seeking rental accommodation. It is mainly the young professionals, who are flocking to the city for its huge career opportunities, that make up the bulk of renters in the city. Angel Gardens will be ideally placed for the many employed in the NOMA area, as well as those commuting into Manchester Victoria.

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An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

Traditionally, only those with access to large amounts of capital have been able to invest in the lucrative world of property. Managing a portfolio is normally time-consuming, business, which becomes increasingly more burdensome as the investor’s portfolio becomes larger.

However, in the last few years, a new method of property investment has emerged which has effectively democratised the entire investment process, allowing more people than ever to benefit from the financial gains that property investment can offer.

Property crowdfunding started to take off in 2012, and is now worth billions of dollars a year worldwide. The value of the industry currently doubles every two months, and is set to be worth $250bn by 2020.

The growth of the property crowdfunding industry has been catalysed, in part, by the relaxation of regulations over the last few years. The Government has identified the industry as being hugely beneficial to the economy, and has also begun investing in crowdfunding itself. Institutional investment is also coming into play at an increasing rate, and high net worth investors, attracted by the simplicity of the process, and the returns available, are also investing through property crowdfunding.

But why is investing in property crowdfunding proving so popular?

Offering the chance to build a diverse portfolio without all the legwork involved in traditional property investment models, and with the opportunity for significant gains, it’s no surprise that investing in property crowdfunding has grown exponentially in the last few years.

What’s more, as interest rates on savings continue to crawl along the seabed, and returns from both rental and sales continue to rise, more and more people are waking up to crowdfunding as a simple way to grow their money.

How Does It Work?

Property crowdfunding encompasses both equity investments and debt based investment (also known as peer to peer secured lending).

The concept itself is relatively simple.

Equity investments involve a group of people pooling their cash to buy a property as shareholders through a ‘Special Purpose Vehicle’ (SPV). The SPV is a limited company, set up solely for the purchase of that property. The SPV handles all the work, fees and maintenance of the property, whilst the shareholders receive their proportion of the rental yields, and/or share of capital gains when the property is sold.

People can invest even very small sums in buying shares in the property. On some platforms, this is as low as £50, but the typical minimum is between £500 and £1000. One of the advantages of property crowdfunding is that you can spread your available capital over a number of different properties across the crowdfunding platform, to mitigate risk.

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Getting started is a very quick and easy process. You simply register on your chosen website – it is an FCA requirement that only registered and accredited investors may participate, and, once registered, you simply select the properties you wish to invest in.

Debt based investments again involve pooling resources, in this instance, to make micro loans through the platform to a third party borrower. The loan as a whole is secured against the borrower’s property and the platform appoints an agent to act on behalf of lenders and take any necessary enforcement action. These types of investment are usually short term (up to 12 months, and pay a fixed rate of interest with no capital growth).

Where Did It Start?

The House Crowd is the longest-established property crowdfunding platform. It began trading in 2012 and offers both debt and equity investments. Since then, other companies have followed in their footsteps, such as Property Moose in 2013, and Property Partner and Crowdlords in 2014. The industry continues to expand, with several new platforms emerging each year.

Is It Regulated?

Property crowdfunding firms are all regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which ensures that platforms are managed properly, and that risks are made completely clear to investors. As with any investment, there is risk to capital – but it’s worth comparing this risk against other investment classes, and seeing how property crowdfunding stacks up.

Before investing through property crowdfunding platforms, it is very important to do your research. Every regulated platform should have the FCA authorisation number clearly visible on their website. If you can’t find these details, you should steer clear as they are not operating legally.

Is It The Right Choice For Me?

As with any investment, you need to take into account your personal circumstances to establish whether it is the right one for you.

You can find out more about establishing whether property crowdfunding is the right investment for you here.

Ask yourself what you wish to achieve. Investors with a lot of professional experience and access to bank funding, may find the model less appealing than novices.

If, on the other hand, you don’t have a deposit available, or aren’t able to get a mortgage, then investing through property crowdfunding could be an ideal way for you to access this asset class. And, given the government’s recent attacks on landlords, which has severely undermined the profitability and viability of buy-to-let investing for individual investors, it may well be that crowdfunding remains the only sensible option available for most.

Risk

The same principles that apply to other forms of property investment also apply to crowdfunding. You should be aware that capital growth profits are speculative, and investing in properties that produce a healthy cash flow is the more sensible approach.

One of the major risks associated with cash flow positive properties is that of damage or non-payment of rent. As such, you should always factor this in as an eventuality that may affect your yields. As mentioned above, however, if you have a well-diversified portfolio, with your capital spread over several properties, any losses due to one bad tenant will be more bearable than if you had all your eggs in one basket.

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At the end of the day, it all comes down to your risk tolerance. You do lose a large amount of leverage by investing through property crowdfunding, and you will only benefit proportionately from the property’s capital growth but, at the same time, having no borrowing means significantly less risk as there are no mortgage payments and no danger of the property being repossessed (as shareholders own it outright).

If making crowdfunded debt-based investment, (aka peer to peer lending) you need to know what would happen if the borrower defaults and does not repay the loan. You should ask questions about how your investment would be protected, what happens in the event of a default – how easy is it to take control of the secured property? – and how much equity is available to enable you to recover your money should the worst happen. Unless there is sufficient equity in the property, you could risk losing some or all of your money.

If you opt for debt-based investments, your investment will be secured by a legal charge. A critical matter to consider is at what LTV the loan is made. If, for example, a loan is made at ‘75% LTV’, it means that you will be at risk of losing some of your capital if the borrower defaults, the property has to be seized, and is sold for less than 75% of its current valuation.

Debt investments are generally considered to be lower risk than equity investments, as lenders are always paid out before shareholders, however, you do not get the potential upside of capital growth.

What About If I Want Out of My Investment?

If you need a liquid asset, then property is not the best choice.

Investing through property crowdfunding facilitates liquidity to some degree as it may be easier to sell shares in a property than the whole property. However, there is never any guarantee that you will be able to find a buyer, and, if you cannot do so, you will have to wait until the property is sold.

Some platforms will help you to find a buyer after the expiry of a minimum term, but you should check the small print before you invest. If you’re looking for a short term investment, P2P secured lending may be the better option.

To Conclude

We hope that this has offered you some valuable insight into getting started investing through property crowdfunding. Of course, you should know everything about the ins and outs of any investment before you part with your money, and we are fully committed to helping you know all you need to.

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If you have any questions, you can always get in touch with us and we will be very happy to fill you in.