June 2017 – Monthly Property Development Update

Here is the June 2017 round-up of our current developments and how they are progressing with accompanying build photos.

HCD1 – Regent Street

We have sold two more houses, so four are now proceeding to exchange with one unit left to sell. We also have potential interest in the remaining house from two parties.

HCD2 – No. 10 Alderley Edge

Excellent news as we have now been granted planning permission on four apartments along with payment of all costs incurred in the appeal process.  The development is continuing to progress in all other ways.

HCP156 – Station Road, Marple

All additional works have now been completed on this lovely house. Julian Wadden Estate Agents have uploaded the property details to Right Move and other property sites.  Several viewings have taken place but no offers as yet.

We have organised for the watering of the grass when there are dry spells and the lawns to be cut regularly to keep it looking pristine.  We are also constantly nipping into the house to change flowers in vases and keep it fresh for viewings. Other than that this is in the hands of the agents now – there is nothing more we can do and have to sit and wait for an interested buyer – fingers and toes crossed.

HCD3 – Woodlands

We have had to switch contractors as the one appointed (due to personal financial difficulties) had stopped paying his builders. There is no liability attached to us for this, but it has caused a delay of a couple of weeks.  Work is now progressing on the site again, and there is moderate interest from buyers which we do not expect to increase until the show home is finished.

HCD4 – Gratrix Park

Work is progressing on schedule with no issues to report.

HCD5 – Bank Chambers

The roof is leaking and needs to be repaired so we are costing this out at present. We are also still dealing with planning permission to convert the lower floor – sadly these things are never quick or easy to progress.

Fortunately the ground floor conversion does not impact on progress on the rest of the building.  The area around this building continues to improve with one of the best restaurants in the Manchester area having opened up recently just around the corner – “Where the Light Gets In”, which recently received rave reviews in the Guardian, and is seriously worth a visit if you are in the area.

HCD7 – Brundred Farm, Prestbury

This is still in planning appeal stage. We are more confident of success after the success of the appeal with No 10 Alderley Edge.

HCD10 – Bollin Heights

Apartments 1-4 are almost 90% complete on the build.  The doors are taking a little longer as they are made to measure doors.  The show apartment is completed and ready for viewings. There are some issues with obtaining bricklayers (which is an industry-wide problem) and this is slowing matters down a little.

Don’t forget, if you need any help with the investment process, or have any questions, you can call our client account team, Nigel or Damian, on 0161 667 4264, or email them on: [email protected]

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May Peer To Peer & Development Performance Stats

May 2017 Summary P2P & Development Stats

May 2017 summary and monthly statistics can be seen below.

Bridging Loans 30/05/2017
  Net
Total Amount Lent £18,816,670
Total Returns Paid £592,835
No of Loans 52
No of Loans Repaid 19
Average Loan Period 9
Investor Capital Lost 0%
Average Loan Size £358,721
Average Loan to Value 70%
Average Interest Rate Paid 8.94%

 

Development Loans 30/05/2017
  Net
Total Amount Lent £11,960,571
Total Returns Paid £146,212
No of Loans 18
No of Loans Repaid 6
Average Loan Period 10
Investor Capital Lost 0%
Average Loan Size £664,476
Average Loan to Value N/A
Average Interest Rate Paid 9.74%

You can find all our latest investments by clicking here.


View our Property Investments

Performance Statistics: May 2017

Performance Statistics: May 2017

The figures are now in for our performance statistics from last month. You will see below our summary figures from the dividend, interest and capital payments made in May 2017. You can also see our total cumulative returns from 2013, which you may also find helpful to know.

May 2017

  • Projects paid out against = 31
  • Total value of dividends and interest paid = £89,844.35
  • Total value of capital repaid = £0.00
  • Total number of investors paid = 690

Total for 2017 So Far

  • Projects paid out against = 117
  • Total value of dividends and interest paid = £630,063.77
  • Total value of capital repaid = £3,471,307.39
  • Total number of investors paid = 3,173

Cumulative (from January 2013)

  • Project paid out against = 551
  • Total value of dividends and interest paid = £1,765,688.77
  • Total value of capital repaid = £8,477,027.39
  • Total number of investors paid = 11,671

To find out more about investing with The House Crowd, you can register with us by clicking on the purple button below. Alternatively, take a look at our current property investment opportunities by clicking the blue button! Either way, we’re always here to answer your questions in any way we can.

Register Now for more Info

View our Property Investments

 

General Election: The 2017 Housing Manifesto Of The 3 Major Parties

General Election: The 2017 Housing Manifesto Of The 3 Major Parties

So, the General Election is looming. On 8th June, we face the decision of whether to carry on along the path of ‘strong and stable leadership’ promised by the Tories, or gamble on the prospect of the unknown – a Labour candidate who looks nothing like the party face we’ve been used to over the last two decades. Then there’s the Lib Dems, UKIP, or the Greens: of which there is much less to say.

But for investors in The House Crowd, the principal focus will be the housing policy offered by each of the major political parties. So, just to save you trawling through the party manifestos, we’ve done the dirty work for you. Here’s what you need to know about the 2017 housing manifesto for the Conservatives, Labour, and Lib Dems. Just an FYI – at time of writing, the Greens and UKIP are still yet to publish their manifestos.

Conservative Party 2017 Housing Manifesto 

The ‘Homes For All’ section of the Tory manifesto begins with a comment that states the blinking obvious: ‘We have not built enough homes in this country for generations, and buying or renting a home has become increasingly unaffordable’. So how do they plan to fix it?

The key, they state, is to build enough homes to meet demand. Again, pretty obvious. They identify that the effect of this would be to slow the rise in housing costs, allowing more ‘ordinary, working families’ to buy a home and also to bring down the cost of renting. Crucially, for investors, this will ensure that more private capital is invested in more productive investment, thus hastening economic growth in a secure way for the future.

The Tory manifesto pledges the delivery of one million homes by the end of 2020, with half a million more by 2022. They promise to deliver on the reforms from their Housing White Paper, freeing up more land for new builds in the ‘right places’, encouraging modern methods of construction, and by giving councils the power to intervene where developers do not act on their planning permissions. The Tories will also diversify who builds homes in the UK.

The plan also includes the building of better homes, supporting ‘high-quality, high-density’ mansion blocks, mews houses and terraced streets. And all this whilst retaining the strong protections that currently exist over designated Green Belt, National Parks, and Areas of Outstanding National Beauty. Thus, the government must build 160,000 houses on its own land, and rebalancing housing growth across the country – not limiting it to the south-east.

Housing for older people is also a priority, so the Tories plan to help housing associations increase their specialist housing stock.

The manifesto identifies councils as being to blame for the failure to build sustainable, integrated communities, fingering them as the ‘worst offenders’ and accusing them of building ‘for political gain rather than for social purpose’. The Tories plan to enter into new Council Housing Deal with ambitious, pro-development local authorities to assist them with building more social housing. ‘We will work with them,’ they say. ‘To improve their capability and capacity to develop more good homes, as well as providing them with significant low-cost capital funding’. As a result, they plan to build new, fixed-term social houses, which will ‘be sold privately after ten to fifteen years with an automatic Right to Buy for tenants’, the proceeds of which will be recycled into further homes. Compulsory Purchase Orders will be reformed, reducing cost and difficulty for councils to use, making it easier to determine sites’ true market value.

Finally, the Conservative 2017 housing manifesto pledges to work with private and public sector house builders to capture the increase in land value created when they build to reinvest in local infrastructure, essential services and further housing, making it more certain that public sector landowners benefit from the increase in land value expected from urban regeneration and development.

Labour Party 2017 Housing Manifesto

Labour have titled the 2017 Housing manifesto section of their election manifesto ‘Secure Homes for All’. It also begins by outlining the housing crisis, and pointing the finger at the Tories for failing to fix the housing crisis in the last seven years, stating that ‘Since 2010, housebuilding has fallen to its lowest level since the 1920s… rents have risen faster than incomes, there are almost 200,000 fewer homeowners, and new affordable housebuilding is at a 24-year low’.

Labour’s solution? Investing in building over a million new homes – 100,000 council and housing association homes a year by the end of the next Parliament.

Their plan for a new Department of Housing is ostensibly to ‘ensure housing is about homes for the many, not investment opportunities for the few’. We wonder whether they know about the democratising power of property crowdfunding in this area… and whether they plan to invest in the innovative finance model for real estate at all.

Whilst the Tories accuse local councils of building ‘for political gain rather than for social purpose’, Labour plans to give councils new powers to build homes. They plan to begin the biggest council building program for at least 30 years, ditching the Tories’ ban on long-term council tenancies so that council tenants can have a ‘secure tenancy in a home built to high standards’. The ‘right-to-buy’ policy would be suspended in order to protect affordable housing for local people, unless councils can prove they have a plan to replace homes sold like-for-like.

To avoid urban sprawl, Labour promises to start work on a new generation of ‘New Towns’ to build the homes needed, prioritising building on brownfield sites and – like the Tories – protecting Green Belt land.

The priority, of course, for Labour, is to build new council funds through their National Transformation Fund, which – they say – will ensure a ‘vibrant construction sector with a skilled workforce and rights at work’.

Along with all those council houses, Labour will also build thousands of low-cost homes specifically reserved for first-time buyers, giving local people buying their first home ‘first dibs’ on new homes built in their area. Labour councils across the country, they say, have already been building an average of nearly 1,000 more new homes than Conservative councils.

Just as the Tories do, Labour pledges to ‘not only build more, [but to] build better’. More homes will be insulated, and new modern standards for building ‘zero carbon homes’ will be implemented. Equally, the party plans to consult on new rules on minimum space standards, and introduce new minimum standards to ensure properties are ‘fit for human habitation’ and ‘empowering tenants to take action if their rented homes are substandard’. Like the Tories, Labour also identifies the need for older people’s housing, ‘ensuring that local plans’ address this need. There’s also their predictable promise to ‘reverse the cruel decision’ to abolish housing benefit for 18-21 year olds, a controversial move by the Tories that has had many up in arms.

Controls on rent rises, more secure tenancies, landlord licensing and new consumer rights for renters are all promised. They also promise an inflation cap on rent rises, and to make three-year tenancies the norm. They equally state that they’ll legislate to ban letting agent fees for tenants – which seems a slightly odd statement considering this is already in the pipeline.

Liberal Democrat Party 2017 Housing Manifesto

In the same vein as the two major political parties, the Lib Dems, too, begin their 2017 Housing manifesto section with the (not-so) news that the ‘housing crisis in Britain has become an emergency’. Their figures for increasing the rate of housebuilding are to double the current level to 300,000 new homes a year.

Rather kindly, the Lib Dems have broken their housing pledge down into bullet points, which makes it rather easier to share verbatim:

We will:

  • Directly build homes to fill the gap left by the market, to reach our housebuilding target of 300,000 homes a year, through a government commissioning programme to build homes for sale and rent. We will ensure that half a million affordable, energy-efficient homes are built by the end of the parliament.
  • Create at least 10 new garden cities in England, providing tens of thousands of high-quality, zero-carbon homes, with gardens and shared green space, jobs, schools and public transport.
  • Set up a new government-backed British Housing and Infrastructure Development Bank with a remit including providing long-term capital for major new settlements and helping attract finance for major housebuilding projects.
  • End the Voluntary Right to Buy pilots that sell off housing association homes and the associated high value asset levy.
  • Lift the borrowing cap on local authorities and increase the borrowing capacity of housing associations so that they can build council and social housing.
  • Scrap exemptions on smaller housing development schemes from their obligation to provide affordable homes, and strengthen the hand of local government to prevent large developers reneging on their commitments.
  • Require local plans to take into account at least 15 years of future housing need – focusing on long-term development and community needs.
  • Create a community right of appeal in cases where planning decisions go against the approved local plan.
  • Enable local authorities to: – Levy up to 200% council tax on second homes and ‘buy to leave empty’ investments from overseas. – Enforce housebuilding on unwanted public sector land. – Penalise excessive land-banking when builders with planning permission have failed to build after three years. – End the Right to Buy if they choose.
  • Help people who cannot afford a deposit by introducing a new Rent to Own model where rent payments give tenants an increasing stake in the property, owning it outright after 30 years.
  • Improve renting by banning lettings fees for tenants, capping upfront deposits and increasing minimum standards in rented homes.
  • Help young people into the rental market by establishing a new Help to Rent scheme to provide government-backed tenancy deposit loans for all first-time 62 Support Families and Communities 6 renters under 30.
  • Give British buyers a fair chance by stopping developers advertising homes abroad before they have been advertised in the UK.
  • Give tenants first refusal to buy the home they are renting from a landlord who decides to sell during the tenancy at the market rate according to an independent valuation.
  • Promote longer tenancies of three years or more with an inflation-linked annual rent increase built in, to give tenants security and limit rent hikes.
  • Improve protections against rogue landlords through mandatory licensing and allow access for tenants to the database of rogue landlords and property agents.
  • End the scandal of rough sleeping by increasing support for homelessness prevention and adequately funding age-appropriate emergency accommodation and supported housing, while ensuring that all local authorities have at least one provider of the Housing First model of provision for long-term, entrenched homeless people.

So that’s the top three parties covered. Clearly, there’s plenty to consider; lots of contrasts, but equally lots of crossover between opposing parties. Who’s getting your vote on 8th June? Actually, don’t answer that – no one wants to deal with another war in the Comments section on Facebook… there’s too many of those out there already.

What Makes The House Crowd Different?

What Makes The House Crowd Different?

Property crowdfunding is a fast growing industry within the investment and savings sector. Inspired by our model and our success as the first property crowdfunding platform in the world, many imitators have emerged to challenge the crown.

Yet, despite the increasingly competitive industry, we continue to be the best crowdfunding platform of all (officially!) So what’s the secret to our success?

Most people will tell you that the way to differentiate yourself within your market is simply to be different. But any old idiot can be different – you’ve got to back up your uniqueness with solid foundations.

We stand out from the crowd because we are expert at what we do and we do it with complete transparency. Investors appreciate the low minimum invest level, investment security is high, and the opportunities for diversification within the asset class are excellent.

Besides all that, we still have to provide a compelling reason for people to get behind us. And that is precisely what The House Crowd has done.

The First And Still The Best

We have always defined ourselves as original thought-leaders. Because we were the first property crowdfunding platform, it goes without saying that we know a good deal of everything there is to know about the industry – after all, we invented it. But, moreover, we are at the forefront when it comes to anticipating, identifying, and reacting to changing circumstances to ensure we meet investors’ needs.

Frazer: The Face of The House Crowd

Besides our obvious expertise, there is also a recognisable face at the forefront of The House Crowd as a brand. That face, of course, is Frazer. It is Frazer’s vision that gave birth to the property crowdfunding model, and his story is one that is as human as it is inspirational.

From his Manchester rave culture adolescence, to his career as a music lawyer, through to a range of entrepreneurial projects, and the eventual dawning of property crowdfunding, Frazer has lived a varied and vibrant life.

The hard work, skills, and knowledge it took him to get The House Crowd off the ground, legally permissible, and into the public eye are a testament to the power of labour and perseverance. To know that there is a man who has a lifelong passion for entrepreneurial spirit is an appealing and assuring concept for people searching for the right hands into which to trust their investment.

Hard work and skills may have been what got The House Crowd off the ground, but part of Frazer’s continued popularity is his honest and sometimes forthright way of communicating. He is a character who has always questioned the status quo, famously leaving his glamorous career in law after being told that ‘love is not a word lawyers use’ by his boss. Never afraid to swim against the tide, it’s both Frazer’s boldness and his intuition for what works that breed confidence from others.

By equal measure, he owns up to his investment mistakes; he shares and clearly articulates how he endeavours not to make the same mistake again. These are rare qualities in most leaders.

Swimming Against The Tide

It is Frazer’s questioning of the status quo that has fed the originality of The House Crowd’s manifesto.

The company has always been about democratising property investment, opening the doors to people from all walks of life. Regardless of how much or how little somebody has to invest, our policy has always been the same: we treat everyone with the same openness, attention, and we care for their money as if it were our own.

Our honesty and transparency differentiate us from the faceless competition, who despite adopting our innovative model, still slump through the dark ages when it comes to their attitude to investors. To us, our investors are all equal, and are welcomed in as though we were a family (if that’s not too trite an analogy).

These are the reasons we are different, and the reasons why we continue to lead the way in the property crowdfunding space. As we continue to grow and evolve our model with the changing shape of property in this era of uncertainty, we are adamant that we will never let go of these factors which make us so unique and special. We hope you will join us on the journey.

May 2017 – Monthly Property Development Update

May 2017

Here is a round-up of our latest developments and how they are progressing with accompanying and sometimes interesting photos.

HCD2 – No. 10 Alderley Edge

We are very pleased to announce that we have, this week, won the planning appeals for Alderley Edge (and were awarded full costs). We also already have two parties keen to reserve two of the apartments.

HCD1 – Regent Street

We have received reservation deposits on another three properties at Regent Street.  Assuming all of them go through we will have just two plots remaining – and we have some serious interest in at least one of those. It’s taken quite a bit longer to sell these properties than expected, but we have learned some valuable lessons along the way and they are now selling well.

HCP156 – Station Road Marple

All the issues with the flooding to the cellar have been dealt with and it is now a fully habitable space with flooring.  Our very own Diane (what would we do without her!) has been busy maintaining the lawn and mountaineering up step ladders to trim the hedges in order to keep the property looking attractive to viewers. We recently appointed a new sales agent who is generating a fair amount of interest in the property.  The new photos look great on Rightmove and we had several viewings last week. We await further developments – fingers crossed this property will sell soon as it deserves to be lived in and loved.

HCD5 – Bank Chambers

Our Bank Chambers development of nine apartments is in the heart of thriving up-and-coming Stockport. The roof has now been removed and thankfully no unforeseen horrors were exposed (which is always a danger when converting an old building).  New windows have been fitted and other work is progressing smoothly.

There are still some issues to try and sort out with the conservation officer regarding our plans for the additional apartments on the ground floor, and we are hoping to have some positive news on this shortly (though there are never any guarantees when dealing with council officials who can rather suddenly move the goal posts!)

HCD10 – Bollin Heights

Full planning has been granted for stage two of this development and we are now in the process of applying for stage 3 of the planning permission which involves adding an extension to the rear of the building. We have also have found a personal training company who are keen to set up and operate the fitness studio, and we expect the apartments to be ready for purchasers to move into by October 2017. The sales agents continue to receive strong interest in the remaining apartments.

HCD4 – Gratrix Park

We had a slight issue recently with the drainage on part of the site which has caused minor delays, and we had to create a ‘soak-away’ under the road after negotiation with the council who decided they weren’t going to pay for it – joy. This has created additional and unexpected costs, but everything else is progressing well. We anticipate the show house and the first few units will be complete by early July 2017.

HCD3 – The Woodlands

We had a few problems with the council towards the start of the year, but everything is now resolved. The foundations for the first tranche of houses have been laid and work is progressing at a decent pace. Interest from local Yorkshire home buyers (who have to date been somewhat sceptical about the idea of buying off-plan) has started growing as potential buyers can now see the site developing and taking shape. Our priority is to get the show home ready as quickly as possible to aid off-plan sales.

 HCD13 – Coppenhall Way

We have exchanged contracts and the pre-completion conditions should be finished this week so that we can start clearing the site and ‘breaking ground’ before the end of the month.

HCD7 – Brundred Farm Prestbury:

No change – we are still waiting on the outcome of the planning appeal.

Don’t forget, if you need any help with the investment process, or have any questions, you can call our client account team, Nigel or Damian, on 0161 667 4264.

Register Now for more Info

View our Property Investments

 

April Peer To Peer & Development Performance Stats

April 2017 Summary P2P & Development Stats

April 2017 summary and monthly statistics can be seen below.

Bridging Loans 30/04/2017
  Net
Total Amount Lent £15,590,670
Total Returns Paid £592,835
No of Loans 44
No of Loans Repaid 19
Average Loan Period 10
Investor Capital Lost 0%
Average Loan Size £339,606
Average Loan to Value 70%
Average Interest Rate Paid 8.94%

 

Development Loans 30/04/2017
  Net
Total Amount Lent £11,010,571
Total Returns Paid £146,212
No of Loans 17
No of Loans Repaid 6
Average Loan Period 10
Investor Capital Lost 0%
Average Loan Size £647,681
Average Loan to Value N/A
Average Interest Rate Paid 9.74%

You can find all our latest investments by clicking here.


View our Property Investments

Performance Statistics: April 2017

Performance Statistics: April 2017

The figures are now in for our performance statistics from last month. You will see below our summary figures from the dividend, interest and capital payments made in April 2017. You can also see our total cumulative returns from 2013, which you may also find helpful to know.

April 2017

  • Projects paid out against = 22
  • Total value of dividends and interest paid = £166,123.59
  • Total value of capital repaid = £589,400 (1 x development capital, 1 x bridging loan & 2 x HCP projects)
  • Total number of investors paid = 769

Total for 2017 So Far

  • Projects paid out against = 86
  • Total value of dividends and interest paid = £540,219.42
  • Total value of capital repaid = £3,471,307.39
  • Total number of investors paid = 2,483

Cumulative (from January 2013)

  • Project paid out against = 520
  • Total value of dividends and interest paid = £1,675,844.42
  • Total value of capital repaid = £8,477,027.39
  • Total number of investors paid = 10,981

To find out more about investing with The House Crowd, you can register with us by clicking on the purple button below. Alternatively, take a look at our current property investment opportunities by clicking the blue button! Either way, we’re always here to answer your questions in any way we can.

Register Now for more Info

View our Property Investments

 

Frazer’s Book Is The Number 1 Bestseller!

As you’re probably aware by now, Frazer has written another book called ‘The Alternative Guide To Property Investment’ which is all about how you can use crowdfunding to build your property portfolio and a better financial future for you and your family.

The book was available for pre-order yesterday, and he already managed to top the charts for real estate, personal finance and investing, making it a bestseller!

You can order the book off Amazon here

Here are some of the reviews so far…

“Frazer has written this book using common English words which are spoken by most people every day, which makes this book a joy to read. It is almost like a modern courtroom drama with the various points discussed, analysed, the evidence being carefully considered as the reader is guided through this book with short chapters, and a complete lack of waffle or flannel (if you prefer). I wished that Frazer had written this book 5 years earlier!”

John Miller (crowdfunding investor)

“An invaluable and enlightening insight for your financial future’’

Nigel Beverley (crowdfunding investor)

“This book shows how I can secure my family’s future through property investment, whilst avoiding the usual hurdles. It gives me peace of mind that crowdfunding platforms exist and, more importantly, that they are run by real property experts.”

Gareth Clements (crowdfunding investor)

“I‘m retired and always looking for the best way to boost my income each year. This guide is essential reading for anyone who wants to control their own investment decisions. Why didn’t someone tell me about this brilliant alternative form of investment before now.”

Paul Stallard (crowdfunding investor)

“Frazer’s book about property crowdfunding gives a fascinating outline of his history over a wide range of ‘job’ experiences which led to the creation of his crowd-sharing property business (I think its success must stem from him earning money from ‘magic’ shows in his early teens, coupled with the rigorous training of a law degree.)

As for the main part of the book, I read it with much interest (non-monetary!) – it was very thorough – and when I had finished it, I felt that I had no questions left to ask about property crowdfunding! It also reinforced my opinion that ‘I had done the right thing’ in putting some of my pennies into such a scheme!”

Dr. Philip Briggs (crowdfunding investor)

Residential v Commercial Property Investment

Residential v Commercial Property Investment

This is an excerpt from Chapter 6, ‘Residential versus Commercial Property Investment’, of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

We have discussed the residential property investment sector at some length, but commercial property can be an excellent addition to a healthy investment portfolio if you are looking for consistent, steady yields alongside a decent level of growth.

Commercial real estate has shown long-term positive performance, with combined annual returns averaging around 9% depending on the area and type of property.

The steady and predictable cash stream potentially afforded by rental income from commercial property translates to possible protection against volatility in financial markets.

Here are some reasons why investors may find commercial property attractive:

  • Historically strong returns – With an average annual return of about 9% over a 20-year period commercial real estate has performed well historically.
  • Rental income from stable commercial properties means a potential steady and predictable cash stream (translating into possible protection and diversification during financial market volatility).
  • Beneficial taxation – When structured properly, commercial property can offer investors a number of tax benefits.
  • A hedge against inflation – A potentially important factor for your portfolio, since property normally benefits from inflation.
  • Ability to leverage your capital – As with residential property you can obtain mortgages and potentially multiply your ROCE (return on capital employed).
  • Diversification – There is no direct correlation with the stock market and you can further diversify within the asset class itself.

These are some of the different types of commercial property into which you can invest and spread your risk:

  • Office property (either prime or secondary);
  • Industrial property: Warehouse and manufacturing units; heavy manufacturing; light assembly; ‘flex’ warehouses (mixed industrial/office space); and bulk warehouses, like distribution centres.;
  • Retail: Individual shops,takeaways, shopping centres, etc.;
  • Multi-unit apartment buildings/HMOs: Although providing homes, these are treated as commercial premises;
  • Self-storage: Self-contained units rented to tenants for storage of material items, usually on a monthly basis;
  • Hotels: Bed and breakfast, small boutique hotels or big-name establishments.

However, property investors when they start investing seem to prefer residential, perhaps understandably, as it falls more easily within their knowledge base and comfort zone.

The philosophical difference between residential and commercial is that when you invest in residential property, you are essentially transacting with individuals – it is a much more personal transaction especially as people will be living in your property and making it their home.


To read more about why to invest in property, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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